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3:46am

Thu July 5, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with the back story on VIP loans.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: A former mortgage company, Countrywide, used a VIP loan program to buy influence with members of Congress, staffers and other officials, including a number at Fannie Mae, the government backed mortgage giant central to Countrywide's business. That the bottom line of a new report out today from the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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2:15am

Thu July 5, 2012
Southword

Meet Al Black: Florida's Prison Painter

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Al Black is one of Florida's 26 officially recognized "Highwaymen" — a loosely affiliated group of artists who began painting in the 1960s, some of whom are still at it today.
Courtesy of Gary Monroe

In the 1960s, Al Black could be found cruising up and down Route 1 in his blue-and-white Ford Galaxy — with a trunk full of wet landscape paintings.

At the time, he was a salesman who could snatch your breath away and sell it back to you. As artist Mary Ann Carroll puts it, he could "sell a jacket to a mosquito in summer."

"A salesman is a con-man," Black readily admits himself today. He's a storyteller. And does he have stories to tell.

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2:13am

Thu July 5, 2012
Revolutionary Road Trip

In Libya's Shifting Sands, Kids Try To Find Their Way

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Three students outside the Science College of Benghazi University. They say they expect to have opportunities in Libya that would not have been possible when Moammar Gadhafi was in power.
John W. Poole NPR

In a stretch of sandy wasteland, Hisham Sadowi, 12, smacks a tee shot across a makeshift golf course in Benghazi, Libya.

On this course with no grass, local rules allowed him to place the ball on a little square of artificial turf he carries around.

Hisham dreams of becoming a professional golfer, and he stops briefly to speak to us. We asked him who his favorite golfer is.

"Tiger Woods," he exclaims.

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2:13am

Thu July 5, 2012
Dead Stop

Beyond The Music In St. Louis Cemetery No. 2

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 9:25 pm

Ernie K-Doe poses outside his Mother-In-Law Lounge during Jazz Fest in New Orleans in 2001. He died a few months later and was buried in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2.
Pat Jolly AP

There's so much water in, around and underneath New Orleans, that the dead spend eternity in tombs above ground.

Most of the tombs now have a similar design: On top, there's space for a wooden coffin or two, and at the bottom lies a potpourri of decanted family remains. Sooner or later, whoever is up high must vacate and settle lower, making room for the newly dead. That's how families stay together — in a desiccated jumble of grandpas, grandmas, siblings and cousins.

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6:23am

Wed July 4, 2012
Around the Nation

A Cheesy Twist On This Indpendence Day

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a cheesy twist on Independence Day. A replica of Mount Rushmore is on display today in West Palm Beach, Florida. This version is carved out as a 640-pound block of cheddar cheese. It was sculpted by Troy Landwehr, an expert cheese carver from, of course, Wisconsin. He told the Sun Sentinel that Abraham Lincoln's bushy eyebrows were one of the hardest features to carve. His creation is titled "My Country 'Tis of Cheese." It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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