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3:47am

Wed August 8, 2012
NPR Story

Business News

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 10:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with markets rather optimistic.

Stock market averages in Asia closed higher today for the third day in a row. There's apparently a feeling that the U.S. and Europe are poised to make moves that will help the global economy. Investors are betting that the Federal Reserve will launch new stimulus action. And they're also betting that some decisive action will be taken soon to reign in the fiscal crisis in Europe.

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2:27am

Wed August 8, 2012
Sweetness And Light

How Can You Really Measure The Greatest Olympian?

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 10:52 am

Before U.S. swimmer Michael Phelps broke the record for the most medals, did anyone say the precious record-holder, gymnast Larisa Latynina, was the greatest Olympian?
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

I always like it when Olympic champions from one sport go to another competition, so I was particularly touched to see Kobe Bryant, with his children in tow, watching as the magnificent Michael Phelps bid adieu to his sport by winning yet one last gold.

Phelps and Bryant are connected these days, too, because both have prompted some historical conversation. Kobe boasted that his current U.S. basketball squad could beat the sainted Dream Team of '92, while Phelps, simply by piling up more medals, opened up the barroom debate about who might be the greatest Olympian ever.

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2:26am

Wed August 8, 2012
Books News & Features

With 'Last Book Sale,' Lit Giant Leaves One More Gift

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 11:54 am

Booked Up Inc. helped put author Larry McMurtry's hometown on the map when it became one of the largest used bookstores in the country.
Donna McWilliam AP

Larry McMurtry is perhaps best known for novels like The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment and Lonesome Dove; but the author also has a career as a bookseller.

His store, Booked Up, spills across four buildings in his small hometown of Archer City, Texas, and houses nearly half a million rare and used books. But starting this Friday, McMurtry is holding an auction to whittle down that number — by a lot.

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2:25am

Wed August 8, 2012
First And Main

Florida Market Draws Candidates Like Bees To Honey

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 6:36 pm

Parkesdale Farm Market is run by Jim Meeks, 70, and his extended family, including his daughter-in-law Xiamara Meeks, 36. Business is booming and the stand has been a mainstay on presidential campaign stops since the days of George H.W. Bush.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

As the presidential election nears, Morning Edition has begun a series of reports from an iconic American corner: First and Main. Several times in the next few months, we'll travel to a battleground state, then to a vital county in each state. In that county, we find a starting point for our visit: First and Main streets, the intersection of politics and real life.

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2:18am

Wed August 8, 2012
Asia

Japan's Nuclear Debate Weighs Safety, Economics

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 2:28 pm

Anti-nuclear protesters carry "No nukes" banners during a march in Tokyo last month. Protests against Japan's use of nuclear power have grown in the aftermath of the March 2011 Fukushima disaster.
Koji Sasahara AP

At 6 p.m. every Friday — with the kind of precision timing the Japanese live by — the protests in downtown Tokyo begin.

Thousands of Japanese — young, old, in wheelchairs and on skateboards — shout anti-nuclear slogans from behind police barricades that snake around the office of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda. Over the past four months, the protests have swelled; at least 75,000 people turned out at a recent demonstration.

Nobuyuki Miyazaki, an office worker, says this is the first time he's ever been to a demonstration.

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