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Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep, and Kate Archer Kent

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2:29am

Mon April 29, 2013
All Tech Considered

After Sandy, Questions Linger Over Cellphone Reliability

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 12:07 pm

Residents of the East Village in New York City look for cellphone reception Nov. 1 after Hurricane Sandy wiped out power and some cell towers.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Roughly one in four cellphone towers in the path of Hurricane Sandy went out of service. It was a frustrating and potentially dangerous experience for customers without a landline to fall back on. Now, local officials and communications experts are pushing providers to improve their performance during natural disasters.

Lori McCaskill lives in Brooklyn, and when Sandy hit last October, her Verizon cell service went out. She couldn't work. She couldn't check in with family and friends. Her sister was due to have a baby any day.

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2:28am

Mon April 29, 2013
Author Interviews

A Grieving Brother Finds Solace In His Sister's 'Small Town'

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 11:21 am

Brother and sister Rod Dreher and Ruthie Leming grew up in a small town in rural Louisiana. Dreher left the tightknit community to pursue a journalism career but returned home after Leming died of lung cancer in 2010.
Courtesy Rod Dreher

When he was a teenager, journalist Rod Dreher couldn't wait to escape Louisiana. Now he has found his way home again in grief — after his sister's death from lung cancer. It was "in light" of that tragedy, Dreher says, that he discovered the value of community. It's the subject of his new book, The Little Way of Ruthie Leming: A Southern Girl, a Small Town, and the Secret of a Good Life.

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2:26am

Mon April 29, 2013
Shots - Health News

How To Turn Down The Heat On Fiery Family Arguments

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 9:54 am

Parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children using a few simple techniques to calm down.
iStockphoto.com

All parents are bound to disagree, argue or even raise their voices with each other.

But psychologists say parents can minimize the negative impact of their arguments on their children. It's just a matter of using a few simple techniques to turn down the heat and repair the damage after it's over.

Psychologist Suzanne Phillips at Long Island University says one of the most important things for parents to remember when they're on the verge of a big argument is not to involve the child.

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9:06am

Fri April 26, 2013
Business

Samsung Rings Up Sales

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 5:59 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Samsung ringing up sales.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: Samsung said this morning its first quarter profit is at a record high - net profit surged 42 percent. The company has now seen six straight quarters of growth, thanks to strong smartphone sales. Tomorrow, it's launching a new smartphone in the United States - the Galaxy S4 - which is aimed at taking on Apple's iPhone. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

9:06am

Fri April 26, 2013
History

Alexander Graham Bell Recording Brought To Life

Originally published on Fri April 26, 2013 5:59 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Alexander Graham Bell came up with one of the world's most important acoustical devices, but his own voice had been lost until now. The Smithsonian has found the inventor's voice on a wax disc from 1885. Listen closely.

(SOUNDBITE OF RECORDING)

ALEXANDER GRAHAM BELL: Here is my voice. Alexander Graham Bell.

MONTAGNE: Alexander Graham Bell. That old recording was brought to life with digital technology. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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