Morning Edition

Weekdays 4am to 9am
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep, and Kate Archer Kent

Morning Edition,  NPR's premiere morning. 

Marketplace Morning Report at 4:50, 6:50 and 8:50
A Moment of Science at 6:36
Get It Growing at 7:19
Earth and Sky at 7:33
History Matters at 7:35 on Tuesday
Eco Tech Minute at 7:33 Wednesday's
What Was I Thinking at 7:35 on Thursday
Dr. Archie McDonald's Commentary at 7:35 on Friday

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3:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

3:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
NPR Story

Afghan Violence Continues Over Quran Burning

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 6:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's go next to Afghanistan, where a car bomb exploded outside a U.S. air base today. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack which killed nine people. This latest wave of violence follows reports of American soldiers burning several copies of the Muslim holy book, the Quran.

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3:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
NPR Story

European Debt Crisis Still Threatens Global Recovery

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with loans for European banks.

The European debt and banking crisis is still the biggest threat to the global economy, and this week, more money will go to try and ease the pain.

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3:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
NPR Story

China's Economy Slows Down

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 6:37 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's try to get a glimpse of the future here. No country has grown so quickly for so long as China. But a report out today from the World Bank - and a Chinese government think tank - says China must change the way it runs its economy or risk a financial crisis in the future.

NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from Shanghai.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: China built itself into the world's second-largest economy by allowing market competition, but still funding and favoring its state-owned companies.

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2:26am

Mon February 27, 2012
Race

Through Video, Lakota Students Reject Stereotypes

Feather Rae Colombe (from left) appeared in the Lakota student video More Than That. Kim Bos is a video technology teacher who helped produce the video. Student John Whirlwind Soldier directed the video.
Jim Kent

Unhappy with portrayals of Native Americans in mainstream media, a group of students from South Dakota's Rosebud Sioux Reservation created a video to show that their community is about more than alcoholism, broken homes and crime.

The students are visiting Washington, D.C., on Monday to lobby Congress for increased funding for schools on reservations.

Filmed in black and white, the student-produced video More Than That takes viewers through the hallways, classrooms and gymnasium of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation's county high school.

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