Science

Red River Radio Spotlight: Particle Fever at the Robinson Film Center

Apr 16, 2014

Aired Wednesday, April 16 at 12 noon. Bill Beckett talks with Alexandre Kent, the Executive Director of the Robinson Film Center and Dr. Lee Sawyer, a professor of physics at Louisiana Tech University about the film “Particle Fever,” a documentary which captures the launch of the Large Hadron Collider. “Particle Fever,” will be screened at the Robinson Film Center beginning Friday with a special showing Saturday, April 19 at 5 p.m. followed by a talk with Dr. Sawyer who will field questions to help audience members understand why this unprecedented experiment matters to scientists and non-­scientists alike. If you’d like more information contact the Robinson Film Center online at or call 318-459-4122.

Aired Tuesday, March 18 at 6 p.m. Once again Ornithologist Cliff Shackelford, from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, took your questions about all our feathered friends on "Bird Calls" from Red River Radio. If you have a photo or the recorded sound of a bird that you'd like Cliff to research and identify for a future show please send them to wbeckett@lsus.edu and we'll ask Cliff to help identify the bird. We'll also post your photos and recorded sounds on our website after the show. Our Next Bird Calls will be on Tuesday, May 20 at 6 p.m.

Kate Archer Kent

Centenary College’s annual symposium called "Forum" gets underway this week with a focus on science and religion in public schools. Three events are planned to spark a community conversation. 

TED Radio Hour debuts. Red River Radio will bring the TED Radio Hour to our listeners every Wednesday Night at 7 p.m. In this story, Everything Is Connected. Every species plays a crucial role in our natural world. But when humans tinker with the equation, a chain reaction can cause entire ecosystems to break down. In this hour, TED speakers explain how everything is connected in nature, with some bold ideas about how we can restore the delicate balance and bring disappearing ecosystems back.

Airs Sunday, July 7 at 6 p.m. How can Louisiana better equip its citizens for future STEM positions?      Occupations in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) are projected to grow by nearly 10% over the next five years. Experts estimate Louisiana alone will have 69,000 STEM job vacancies by 2018. But who will fill these positions?      Nationwide, more than 300,000 jobs are currently being left vacant because employers can’t find individuals skilled enough in STEM. In Louisiana, 40% of eighth-graders report never designing a science project. Only 3% of high-school seniors take advance college placement tests in science. While male students have shown a recent increased interest in STEM, Louisiana females’ interest has been decreasing since 2008.      So, how can Louisiana better equip its citizens for future STEM positions? Are Louisiana’s educators adequately prepared to teach STEM courses? And how can students be encouraged to pursue STEM careers? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers to these questions and more on “STEM Status: Science, Technology, Engineering & Math in Louisiana.”

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