Middle East

Airs Sunday, July 12, at 6 p.m. This year the 5 permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany negotiated an interim nuclear accord with Iran that includes limiting Iran's enrichment capacity and stockpile. Many in the U.S. fear that a deal as it is being negotiated would not go far enough and, instead of being a benefit, would strengthen Iran’s hand in the Middle East. Is this agreement a “once-in-a-lifetime opportunity” to halt nuclear proliferation, or does President Obama have this wrong? The debaters are Philip Gordon, Michael Doran, Thomas Pickering, and Mark Dubowitz.

Airs Sunday, July 27 at 6 p.m. Film, music and art are often the best ways to capture the will and the mood of the people in times of turmoil. Art sometimes has the power to move millions where politics fails. So in this program we attempt to identify some prominent artistic voices in the Middle East, North Africa and in South Asia and evaluate their take on liberal ideals, on sectarian violence, on terrorism and how they're being received by audiences in both the Arab and Muslim communities and in the West.

Press Image / LSU Shreveport

Commentator Gary Joiner explores the dirt under our feet and sweeps it into today's history lesson.

Airs Sunday, April 21 at 6 p.m. In "Global Energy and Innovtions," we'll hear how the energy community has debated the need for a balance between oil, gas, and renewables here at home. We'll hear how India and China, with their own booming populations and increasing energy needs, are planning out their own energy needs. And we'll hear how energy technologies being developed at MIT are shaping future technologies, which are being exported to, of all places, the oil-rich Middle East. 

Airs Sunday, March 17 at 6 p.m.
Anchored by Ray Suarez
The Arab awakening has led to a rise in Islamist governments in the Middle East – raising concerns about the rights of religious minorities. The Middle East is largely Muslim but it’s also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism, and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects. Now, the rise of Islamist political parties in the Mideast raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect or whether they can expect them at all. In this edition of America Abroad, we’ll learn about the Jewish population in Tunisia, and how they're faring under a new Islamist government there.  We'll hear from Egypt about the Christian community and their reactions to a new president. And we'll provide a primer on Alawites, the minority Muslim sect to which Syria's president Bashar al-Assad belongs.

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