LSU Health Shreveport

Kate Archer Kent

Two LSU Health Shreveport physicians are among more than 100 people who will be honored in May as recipients of this year’s Ellis Island Medal of Honor.  The ceremony will take place on the historic New York City island.

The award is given annually by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations to a U.S. immigrant or native-born citizen who has made significant contributions to society.

Dr. Quyen Chu is chief of surgical oncology at LSU Health Shreveport. His family fled Vietnam in 1975, when he was seven.

Kate Archer Kent

Top research scientists from across Louisiana met at LSU Health Shreveport Wednesday to work on improving collaboration across their institutions. 

They’re doing it with the help of LA CaTS, the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science Center in Baton Rouge. It’s funded by a five-year, $20 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The aim is to promote more unified research. Dr. William Cefalu, executive director of Pennington Biomedical Research Center where LA CaTS is based, led the conference.

Kate Archer Kent

Feist-Weiller Cancer Center is starting a loaner hearing aid program for terminally ill cancer patients. All donated hearing aids will be loaned out to the patients who need them during the remaining months of their life. LSU Health Shreveport clinical audiologist Jessica Bever has fielded requests for spare hearing aids from physicians. Unused hearing aids are all around, according to Bever. It’s a matter of collecting them and creating a lending program.

Aired Thursday, October 10 at 6 p.m. This week on Health Matters, Shreveport psychiatrist Dr. Gary Booker, Debbie Hayes of the Alzheimer’s Association in North Louisiana, and Christine Wright, an occupational therapist with LSU Health Shreveport, were our guests to discuss how Alzheimer’s affects patients and families and we took your calls and questions.

Kate Archer Kent

Handshakes, hugs and thank yous marked the Oct. 1 handover of LSU Hospitals in Shreveport and Monroe to the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana or BRF. Under a privatization deal pushed by the Jindal administration, BRF now manages the hospitals with 3,200 employees. BRF president Dr. John George told an overflow crowd in the Biomedical Research Institute Atrium Tuesday that it’s a new day for these north Louisiana hospitals to control their own destiny.