Louisiana Public Square

Airs Sunday, March 6, at 6 p.m. On Governor John Bel Edwards' second day in office, he issued an executive order expanding Medicaid. An estimated 300,000 Louisiana residents will be eligible for coverage. How will the lives of these newly-insured change? What will the expansion mean for the cost of health care and insurance for everyone else? And how will hospitals and those with insurance from healthcare.gov be affected? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers on “Effects of Expansion: Medicaid in Louisiana.”
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Airs Sunday, May 29, at 6 p.m. What challenges do our returning veterans face?Since 2001, 2.6 million service men and women have been deployed to support operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Louisiana joins 11 other states with the second highest percentage of veterans aged 25 and under. The needs for these younger veterans as they return stateside are plentiful including securing civilian employment, obtaining healthcare and oftentimes housing, and addressing the mental rigors of transitioning from military to civilian life.

Press Image / LA Public Square

Airs Sunday, May 8, at 6 p.m. Deaths from drug overdoses have jumped in nearly every community in the United States, driven largely by an explosion in addiction to prescription painkillers and heroin. Heroin-related deaths in East Baton Rouge Parish reached a record high this year even after the state Legislature increased penalties for use of the drug. And opioid arrests have risen dramatically in Shreveport over the last two years.

LPB / LPB

Airs Sunday, April 3, at 6 p.m. If you’re currently accused of a crime in Louisiana but can’t afford to hire an attorney, you may literally be “Defense-less.” Public Defenders Offices in twelve Louisiana districts say they don’t have the resources to keep up with the demand for court-appointed attorneys. Six districts have put suspects on waiting lists for counsel.

Airs Sunday, January 31, at 6 p.m. What happens when police and the people they arrest have different versions of their encounters? Major cities in Louisiana are taking steps to try to solve that problem by equipping their officers with body cameras. So, how do they work and how expensive are they? How are communities covering their costs? Can body cameras deescalate volatile situations? And what privacy issues do they raise? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers on “Police POV: Body Cameras in Louisiana.”

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