Cultural, Community, Information

Red River Radio presents cultural specials throughout the year. Holiday specials, programs on music, theatre, and the arts. We also air documentaries on a wide range of subjects from sciences and politics, to history and our changing communities  . Red River Radio is your source for Great Music, In Depth News, and much more.

Click here full details on each show.

Bird Calls with Cliff Shackelford for January 9, 2018 - Our Profile Special This Month is the Great Horned Owl


Cliff Shackelford
Press Image / Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

Airs Tuesday, February 13, 2018, at 6 p.m. Once again ornithologist Cliff Shackelford, from the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, will be on hand to take your questions about all our feathered friends on "Bird Calls" from Red River Radio. If you have a photo or the recorded sound of a bird that you'd like Cliff to research and identify for the show please send them to wbeckett@lsus.edu. We'll also post your photos and recorded sounds on our website after the show.

Airs Monday, February 12, 2018, at 1 p.m. This week on the Cleveland Orchestra, celebrating the Orchestra's 100 year, we present an archival concert featuring cellist Jacqueline du Pré in the Cello Concerto by Sir Edward Elgar and the Cello Concerto by Lalo. The concert will open with Ravel's Mother Goose Suite.

Press Image / A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood

Airs Monday, February 12, 2018, at 11 a.m. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause. Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

Press Image From BBC
bodym / Getty Images - Used By Permission

Airs February 10, 2018, at 6 p.m. Professor John Oxford, one of the world’s leading virologists, looks at how the 1918 and 1919 flu pandemic affected every corner of the world. Over 50 million people died in the three outbreaks which hit between 1918 and 1919. It’s one of the most devastating pandemics in history and to this day scientists are still trying to pin point its origins in the hope of learning lessons for fighting such a catastrophe in the future. More people died in the so called ‘Spanish Flu’ of 100 years ago, than perished in the First World War.

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