APM Reports

Emily Hanford / APM Reports

Airs Sunday, October 8, 2017, at 6 p.m. One in five American school children has a hard time learning to read. Many of these kids have dyslexia. There are proven ways to help people with dyslexia learn, and a federal law that’s supposed to ensure schools provide kids with help. But across the country, public schools are denying children proper treatment and often failing to identify them with dyslexia in the first place. This APM Reports documentary investigates why and explores how improving things for dyslexic kids could help all students learn to read better.

Airs Sunday, October 1, 2017 at 6 p.m. A growing number of colleges and universities in the eastern United States are confronting their historic ties to the slave trade. Profits from slavery and related industries helped build some of the most prestigious schools in New England. In many southern states, enslaved people built and maintained college campuses. This documentary will focus on three universities – Harvard, Georgetown and the University of Virginia -- as they grapple with a deeply troubling chapter in their vaunted histories. 

EMILY HANFORD / APM REPORTS

Airs Sunday, September 17, 2017, at 6 p.m. There may be nothing more important in the educational life of a child than having effective teachers. But the United States is struggling to attract and keep teachers. The problem is most acute in rural areas, where kids may learn math from a social studies teacher. In urban schools, the teachers most likely to leave are black men, who make up just 2 percent of teachers.

Airs Sunday, September 25, at 6 p.m. The nation's high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. There is virtually no way to make a legal living these days without at least a high school diploma. Still, nearly 20 percent of students don’t finish. Why? This documentary explores what students and teachers are up against in some of the nation’s poorest high schools. We document the progress that has been made at one former “dropout factory” and ask what it would take to help more kids succeed.