American RadioWorks

Airs Sunday, October 18, at 6 p.m. In the 1940s British headmaster Kurt Hahn set up a wilderness school called Outward Bound to teach young men skills they needed to survive World War II – skills like leadership, persistence, and working together. Hahn believed these were skills conventional schools should focus on too. Fifty years later, Hahn’s ideas about education inspired a network of public schools in the United States.

Airs Sunday, October 11, at 6 p.m. The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans.

Airs Sunday, October 4, at 6 p.m. Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they’re on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S.

Airs Sunday, September 27, at 6 p.m. Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement and built the black middle class. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose.

Airs Thursday, February 5 at 7 p.m.  The 1970's saw a tidal change in American race relations: for the first time, large numbers of white, black and other children of color began attending school together. It was an experience that shaped them for life. Using first-person accounts of the era of "forced busing," An Imperfect Revolution explores the ways school desegregation changed the nation.

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