Peter Kenyon

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

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11:01pm

Tue November 8, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Post-Gadhafi Libya, Enmities Continue To Smolder

This abandoned village outside the city of Zintan was populated by pro-Gadhafi families from the Mushashya, a nomadic tribe from southern Libya. Fighters from Zintan, which rebelled against Gadhafi forces, are hoping they won't come back.
Sean Carberry NPR

In Libya's Nafusa mountains southwest of Tripoli, the sight of abandoned villages and idle fighters hanging onto their weapons gives bleak testament to the fact that not everyone in the country is ready for the violence that overthrew former dictator Moammar Gadhafi to end.

In one windswept mountain village outside the city of Zintan, the only sound is the lonely clatter of a door against the gate of an abandoned house. Burned-out cars and a foam mattress soaked from the rain litter the street; most of the houses look as if they've been looted.

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3:08am

Wed October 26, 2011
World

Fresh Violence Strains Reforms For Turkish Kurds

Originally published on Wed October 26, 2011 6:49 am

Thousands of Turks march Sunday in the streets of the capital, Ankara, to denounce the killing of 25 soldiers by the PKK.

Burhan Ozbilici AP

Turkish soldiers, artillery and military aircraft are engaged in their biggest military operation in a decade after a raid last week by the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, killed 24 soldiers and wounded more than 100. The operation comes as Turkish politicians begin to debate a new constitution that many hope will grant Turkey's Kurdish population long-sought civil rights.

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12:46pm

Sun October 23, 2011
World

Powerful Earthquake Strikes Eastern Turkey

A 7.2-magnitude earthquake struck eastern Turkey on Sunday, collapsing dozens of buildings into piles of twisted steel and chunks of concrete. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

12:48pm

Mon October 17, 2011
Middle East

Israel-Palestinian Prisoner Swap Stirs Strong Debate

Originally published on Tue October 18, 2011 11:05 am

Faizeh al-Maslamani (left) with her sister and a portrait of her husband, Ali, due to be released with more than 470 Palestinian prisoners Tuesday. Ali spent most of the past three decades in an Israeli jail. Faizeh says he has 10 grandchildren he's never seen. She hopes he'll accept "a life sentence in the house."

Peter Kenyon NPR

By a strong majority, Israelis support the decision to swap more than 1,000 Palestinian prisoners for one Israeli soldier. Still, it has provoked a painful debate, one that played out Monday, as it has several times before when Israel made similar lopsided trades in the past.

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11:01pm

Tue October 11, 2011
Middle East

Syrian Refugees In Turkey Call For International Help

Syrian refugees gather for a protest against Syrian President Bashar Assad at the Turkish Red Crescent camp in the Yayladagi district of the Turkish city of Hatay near the Syrian border, June 20, 2011. More than 7,000 Syrians are living in camps in Turkey.

Mustafa Ozer AFP/Getty Images

As political unrest and a government crackdown in Syria continue to simmer, more than 7,500 Syrian refugees have fled to camps in southeastern Turkey, and Syrians say many more would come if they could get past the Syrian army.

One of these camps, Altinozu, lies deep in the farm fields of Turkey's Hatay province. It appears to be well-planned and well-run, right down to the asphalt laid between the rows of white tents.

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