Alice Fordham

Alice Fordham is an NPR International Correspondent based in Beirut, Lebanon.

In this role, she reports on Lebanon, Syria and many of the countries throughout the Middle East.

Before joining NPR in 2014, Fordham covered the Middle East for five years, reporting for The Washington Post, the Economist, The Times and other publications. She has worked in wars and political turmoil but also amid beauty, resilience and fun.

In 2011, Fordham was a Stern Fellow at the Washington Post. That same year she won the Next Century Foundation's Breakaway award, in part for an investigation into Iraqi prisons.

Fordham graduated from Cambridge University with a Bachelor of Arts in Classics.

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3:29pm

Mon June 29, 2015
Africa

Some Tourists Show Solidarity With Tunisia After Beach Attack

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 5:32 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:05am

Mon June 29, 2015
Africa

After Slaughter Of Tourists, Tunisia Cracks Down On Islamists

Originally published on Mon June 29, 2015 5:29 pm

Police patrol the beach at Sousse, Tunisia, on Sunday. Tunisian authorities have deployed additional security forces, closed some mosques and banned some Islamist groups in the wake of Friday's terrorist attack at a beachfront hotel.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Tunisia was in shock after at least 38 foreign tourists were killed Friday at a beachside hotel, apparently by one man: Saifeddine Rezgui, who was in turn killed by police.

Amid the horror, there was defiance in the air in the seaside town of Sousse. Hundreds of foreign tourists decided to stay, and were out on the beaches. And local residents held a patriotic demonstration, waving the red national flag and chanting about unity in a palm-fringed square.

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4:12pm

Sat June 27, 2015
World

After Tunisia Attack, Tourists Leave — And Locals Worry

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 5:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:54pm

Tue June 23, 2015
Parallels

Iraqi Soldiers, Generals Shift The Blame For Battlefield Defeats

Originally published on Wed June 24, 2015 8:26 am

Iraqi Sunni volunteers take part in a graduation ceremony at the Habaniyah military base near Ramadi on June 17. Iraq's military is dominated by Shiites and is trying to recruit more Sunni soldiers.
Ahmad Al-Rubaye AFP/Getty Images

When the Iraqi city of Ramadi fell to the self-declared Islamic State last month, it was a big defeat. Ramadi is a provincial capital just 60 miles west of Baghdad, and the setback played into the notion that the Iraqi army is weak and inept.

The U.S. Congress and Pentagon were scathing, saying the Iraqi army lacked the will to fight. There were plenty of other critics as well, though we haven't heard much from the Iraqi soldiers themselves.

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4:18pm

Mon June 8, 2015
Iraq

Ramadi, Iraq, Offensive Delays Efforts To Take Back Mosul

Originally published on Tue June 16, 2015 11:45 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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