2:21am

Tue September 4, 2012
Afghanistan

Afghans Seek A Homegrown Plan For Security

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 11:38 am

An Afghan man inspects a motorcycle used in a suicide attack in a parking lot holding dozens of trucks supplying the NATO-run Kandahar Air Base in June. Bombings and assassinations are on the rise in Kandahar. Last month, a suicide bomber struck the convoy of the provincial police chief, Gen. Abdul Raziq, who was severely injured.
AFP/Getty Images

For years, Kandahar province has been a key focus of NATO's efforts to stabilize Afghanistan. The volatile region is the birthplace of the Taliban, and its capital is the country's second-largest city.

American troops have begun leaving this area by the thousands and are handing security responsibilities over to Afghan forces. Afghan officials claim things are getting better.

But many residents don't trust Western forces or their own government's claims, and they are now turning to a third party for help.

A Dangerous City

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2:20am

Tue September 4, 2012
Author Interviews

'Children Succeed' With Character, Not Test Scores

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 11:38 am

A child's success can't be measured in IQ scores, standardized tests or vocabulary quizzes, says author Paul Tough. Success, he argues, is about how young people build character. Tough explores this idea in his new book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character.

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2:19am

Tue September 4, 2012
Environment

As Temps Rise, Cities Combat 'Heat Island' Effect

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 4:10 pm

An art installation of a melting fan sits on display in a subway station Thursday, June 9, 2011, in Atlanta.
David Goldman AP

More than 20,000 high-temperature records have been broken so far this year in the United States. And the heat is especially bad in cities, which are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

High temperatures increase the risk of everything from asthma to allergies, and can even be deadly. But a researcher in Atlanta also sees this urban heat wave as an opportunity to do something about our warming planet.

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9:00pm

Mon September 3, 2012
Cultural, Community, Information

Caramoor Jazz Festival

Kenny Barron

Airs Monday, September 3 at 9:00 p.m. Join us for highlights from the 19th annual Caramoor Jazz Festival near Katonah, NY. Hosted by WBGO's Rhonda Hamilton and presenting The Cookers,  Gretchen Parlato,  Kenny Barron, the Dee Dee Bridgewater Quintet, Roy Haynes and the Fountain of Youth.

8:00pm

Mon September 3, 2012
Cultural, Community, Information

Bullied: Teen Stories

Phoebe Prince, A 15-year-old who committed suicide on January 14, 2010 after being relentlessly bullied.

Airs Monday, April 16 at 8:00 p.m.  Bullying isn’t a new story, but lately, it is all over the news. And while young people are often the targets and the actors in bullying, we rarely get to hear their perspectives in the media. Bullied: Teen Stories is changing that. This hour-long special produced in collaboration with WNPR includes stories from teens with first-hand insight on bullying. From being called "Osama" in a Boston classroom, to looking at whether bullying prevention programs really work in Anchorage, youth producers from around the globe help show us what we don’t we understand – but need to – about bullying. Join teen hosts Council Brandon and Peython Echelson-Russell for an hour of thought-provoking stories, interviews and teen perspectives on bullying.

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7:00pm

Mon September 3, 2012
Cultural, Community, Information

Life Stories: Women at Work

Airs Monday, September 3 at 7:00 p.m.  Host Alex Chadwick brings us three portraits of women working - A pastor, a seasonal worker, and a judge. These are public radio stories made over many years, by producer Jay Allison -- working together with Christina Egloff, and friends, colleagues, neighbors, strangers and whoever would take the loan of one of his tape recorders. They are stories about life as we find it, and record it. In this hour:

A Pastor's Journal - For two months, the pastor of Park Union Church in Chicago kept an audio journal chronicling her daily life and thoughts about the career and the calling of the ministry. Produced with Rev. Susan Johnson and WBEZ Chicago.

After Labor Day - A short meditation on the end of the summer's work and the long winter ahead from writer Carol Wasserman. Produced with Viki Merrick.

Retiring the Robe - On the occasion of her retirement, this Chicago judge borrowed a cassette recorder, and with her family, reflected on her 18 years on the bench. Produced with Judge Susan Snow, Brent Runyon and WBEZ Chicago. 

7:00pm

Mon September 3, 2012
Cultural, Community, Information

LA Public Square: Bullying in Louisiana

Airs Sunday, September 2 at 7:00 p.m. How can students, parents and teachers fight bullying?
National statistics indicate that nearly 1 in 3 students is involved in bullying. Louisiana has recently seen three high profile suicides linked to bullying at school. So, who is most at risk of being bullied? What is considered cyber bullying? And how can students, parents and teachers stand up against this aggressive behavior? A new anti-bullying state law goes into effect this coming school year, but is the statute too broad in its definition of bullying or not inclusive enough? We'll explore the answers to these questions and more on “Louisiana Public Square”.  (more)

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6:25pm

Mon September 3, 2012
It's All Politics

The Undocumented Bus: In Charlotte, A Different Kind Of Coming Out

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 10:06 pm

Maria Cruz Ramírez, 46, rode on the Undo-bus for six weeks.
Eyder Peralta NPR

The bus is always the center of attention. Partly because it's a hulking 1970s tour bus that somehow made it from Arizona all the way to Charlotte, but mostly because of what's inscribed on the side of it in thick, black letters.

"Sin Papeles, Sin Miedo," it reads in Spanish. "No papers, no fear."

Carrying a bunch of undocumented activists, the bus rolled through the country, through states like Arizona, Texas, Louisiana and Georgia, and into Charlotte on the eve of the Democratic National Convention.

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5:52pm

Mon September 3, 2012
The Two-Way

'Green Mile' Actor Michael Clarke Duncan Dies At 54

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 10:48 am

Michael Clarke Duncan, seen here in 2010, has died at age 54 in a Los Angeles hospital. The actor appeared in more than 70 films, including blockbusters such as Armageddon and Kung Fu Panda.
Angela Weiss Getty Images for AFI

Actor Michael Clarke Duncan has died at age 54, according to his fiancee, the Rev. Omarosa Manigault. Known for his huge size and deep, resonant voice, Duncan received an Oscar nomination for his performance in The Green Mile, the 1999 prison film in which he starred alongside Tom Hanks.

Duncan's death was announced by Manigault, who in July said that she performed CPR on the actor after finding him in a state of cardiac arrest late at night.

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4:52pm

Mon September 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Can Obama 'Reintroduce Hope' At Convention?

Originally published on Mon September 3, 2012 5:55 pm

A delegate shows off her button on the eve of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Jae C. Hong AP

It's been a rough four years since Barack Obama accepted his party's nomination during a celebratory Denver convention that launched the freshman Illinois senator to the White House.

Recovery from the worst economy since the Great Depression has been excruciatingly slow. The national unemployment rate has remained stubbornly above 8 percent.

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