7:34am

Mon July 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Syrian Conflict: Refugees Race To Escape; Battle Goes On In Aleppo

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 11:03 am

Syrian refugee children at the refugee camp in Jordan on Sunday.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images
  • Anthony Kuhn reporting about Aleppo for 'Morning Edition'

The focus of the battle between the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad and opposition fighters remains on the city of Aleppo, where it could be a long, deadly fight before either side can claim victory.

Meanwhile, a refugee crisis continues to build:

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7:18am

Mon July 30, 2012
The Salt

Fun — And Olympic Games — On National Cheesecake Day

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 10:23 am

There's evidence the first Olympic athletes ate cheesecake, but it probably looked a lot different than this.
iStockphoto.com

It turns out to be easier to find out when and where the original Olympic Games were held (776 BC, in Olympia, Greece) than to nail down the story behind National Cheesecake Day.

Yes, in case it had passed you by, today is National Cheesecake Day.

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7:02am

Mon July 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Grid Failure In India Cuts Power To 370 Million

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 9:31 am

Passengers in New Delhi were waiting for trains that couldn't run because of Monday's power outage.
Prakash Singh AFP/Getty Images

An estimated 370 million people — about 60 million more than live in the U.S. — were without power for at least part of today in northern India because of a massive failure in the country's power grid.

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6:35am

Mon July 30, 2012
Europe

Traffic In London Not So Jammed

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 7:24 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Time now for traffic on the 30. London's moving well despite fears the games would clog the city. The M1 highway is busy, but somewhere between normal and nice. And the AP reports inside London no problems at all. The commute to the Houses of Parliament five minutes shorter than normal and bike riders are loving roads cleared of cars for the Olympic races. Wish we were there. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

6:33am

Mon July 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Long Legal Process Begins For Colorado Shooting Suspect

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 7:46 am

James Holmes, in an Arapahoe County, Colo., court on July 23.
AP
  • Kirk Siegler on 'Morning Edition'

Months of pre-trial legal arguments begin in earnest this morning when James Holmes, the man accused of killing 12 people and wounding 58 others in a July 20 shooting rampage at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., appears in an Arapahoe County, Colo., court.

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6:29am

Mon July 30, 2012
Strange News

Japan Plucks Sweden's Ukelele World Record

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 11:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Japan has edged out Sweden for a world record. No, not the Olympics but the Guinness Record for largest ukulele ensemble. More than 2,000 people in Yokohama went to the street to strum their tiny Hawaiian instruments. Trying to top the record is becoming a sport in its own right. Earlier this month in Cairns, Australia, people took on the Swedish record, but they missed the mark by a 150 strummers.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

6:05am

Mon July 30, 2012
London 2012: The Summer Olympics

Olympic Swimming Records Smashed, Hopes Dashed

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 4:16 pm

American Dana Vollmer celebrates after her gold medal win Sunday in the women's 100-meter butterfly swimming final at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park.
Matt Slocum AP

The opening weekend of the Summer Olympics was marked by highs and lows, of course, and the swimming pool had its share of both. World records, a stunning loss and a medal for the home team — and that was all in just one afternoon.

Before American Dana Vollmer answers how a 55.98-second 100-meter butterfly — the fastest time ever, and worth a gold medal — feels, consider this: Vollmer was diagnosed as a teenager with two life-threatening heart conditions that prompted her mom to carry a defibrillator to Dana's races.

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5:01am

Mon July 30, 2012
Middle East

In Syria, Building Up For An Extended Battle

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 4:11 pm

Syrian rebels patrol the streets near Aleppo, Syria.
EPA /Landov

Government troops are battling rebels for control of Syria's largest city, Aleppo. The government launched a major offensive over the weekend to retake neighborhoods held by the Free Syrian Army. Both sides appear to be preparing for an extended battle that could prove crucial to the outcome of the 17-month-old uprising.

After days of massing troops and weapons, the government assaulted rebel-held neighborhoods with tanks, helicopters and artillery, as heard in an amateur video uploaded to YouTube.

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4:04am

Mon July 30, 2012
Technology

Samsung Fight Among Many In Apple's Patent War

Originally published on Mon July 30, 2012 8:01 am

Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S (left) and Apple's iPhone 4 are displayed at the headquarters of South Korean mobile carrier KT. Apple claims some of Samsung's designs violate its patents.
Ahn Young-joon AP

An epic battle between the two biggest smartphone makers begins Monday in a federal district court in San Jose, Calif., where computing giant Apple is asking for more than $2.5 billion from rival phone maker Samsung for patent violations.

The suit would be the most expensive patent violation in history, and it's just one front in Apple's war against phones running Google's Android operating system.

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3:58am

Mon July 30, 2012
Book Reviews

A Portrait Of A Country Awash In 'Red Ink'

Originally published on Fri August 3, 2012 4:15 pm

As the federal debt balloons, reducing it would seem more and more pressing. Yet policymakers remain far apart. Debt, deficit and budget rhetoric is often accompanied by numbers cherry-picked to support a particular political view.

But a new book by Wall Street Journal economics writer David Wessel lays out the numbers that both political parties face.

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