2:38am

Mon February 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Parents Can Learn To Tame A Testy Teenager

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 10:41 am

Brad McDonald and his 14-year-old daughter, Madalyn, are working to understand each other during her teenage years.
Courtesy of Brad McDonald

If you're the parent of a teenager, this may sound familiar: "Leave me alone! Get out of my face!" Maybe you've had a door slammed on you. And maybe you feel like all of your interactions are arguments.

Kim Abraham, a therapist in private practice in Michigan, specializes in helping teens and parents cope with anger. She also contributes regularly to the online newsletter Empowering Parents. Abraham says, for starters, don't take it personally.

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2:33am

Mon February 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Even Radiologists Can Miss A Gorilla Hiding In Plain Sight

Originally published on Thu February 14, 2013 8:37 am

Notice anything unusual about this lung scan? Harvard researchers found that 83 percent of radiologists didn't notice the gorilla in the top right portion of this image.
Trafton Drew and Jeremy Wolfe

2:33am

Mon February 11, 2013
Asia

Auntie Anne's Pretzels In Beijing: Why The Chinese Didn't Bite

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 10:41 am

The China Twist by Wen-Szu Lin chronicles the author's (ultimately unsuccessful) attempt to bring Auntie Anne's pretzels to China.
Courtesy

The lure of the China market is legendary. The dream: Sell something to 1.3 billion people, and you're set.

The reality is totally different.

Ask the MBAs from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School who tried to launch Auntie Anne's pretzels in China. The result is a funny, instructive and occasionally harrowing journey that is now the subject of a new book, The China Twist.

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2:32am

Mon February 11, 2013
Animals

Woof Out The Red Carpet: Westminster Dogs Take New York

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 1:30 pm

Jerry Grymek, doggie concierge at the Hotel Pennsylvania in Manhattan, hands a treat to Rennet, a 10-week-old French bulldog. Rennet came to the hotel from Pennsylvania ahead of the 137th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.
Lam Thuy Vo NPR

On Tuesday night, one dog will be named "best in show" at the 137th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York.

Many of the canines that have flocked to Manhattan are staying at the Hotel Pennsylvania across the street from Madison Square Garden, where judging of the main events in the show is held.

The hotel has special amenities for its four-legged guests.

"Hey, buddy," doggie concierge Jerry Grymek says to a border collie in a crate. "Welcome to the Hotel Pennsylvania."

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2:31am

Mon February 11, 2013
National Security

Procedure Expected To Bog Down Hearing For Alleged Sept. 11 Planners

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 10:44 am

Pretrial hearings resume Monday in the death penalty trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other men accused of planning the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. The men have been in jail, awaiting trial, for more than a decade. The hearings in their case started back in May, and they have hardly moved forward since then.

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2:06am

Mon February 11, 2013
The Record

Mumford & Sons Take Home Album Of The Year Grammy

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:25 am

Mumford & Sons (from left: Ben Lovett, Marcus Mumford, Ted Dwane and Winston Marshall) accept the award for album of the year at the Grammy Awards on Sunday night.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Listen to Mandalit del Barco's radio report from the Grammys at the audio link.

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6:00pm

Sun February 10, 2013
Justice Denied

Human Kind: Justice Denied

Airs Sunday, February 10 at 6 p.m.  How could a nation founded on a Declaration that proclaimed "all men are created equal" permit slavery? Nowhere was this contradiction more stark than in federal courts. In this one-hour Humankind special, we'll consider several historical flashpoints, which forced the judicial issues. In one case, historians, legal scholars and actors re-create the fugitive slave trial of Anthony Burns, a teenager born a slave in Virginia who escaped to freedom in Boston. The federal court proceedings that followed his arrest and court-ordered return to slavery provoked the largest abolitionist protest the nation had ever seen. We also look in-depth at the most controversial ruling in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court -- the Dred Scott case, which held that blacks had "no rights which the white man was bound to respect." We examine how these cases aggravated tensions before the Civil War, stirred up abolitionist sentiment and harmed the legitimacy of the courts.
     With historians including Columbia University’s Eric Foner, who won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for his book, ‘The Fiery Trial – Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery’, we examine the pre-Civil War role that U.S. federal courts played in upholding slavery. We consider the notorious Dred Scott ruling, in which the Supreme Court held that blacks have no rights that whites must respect, as well as a historic fugitive slave case in Boston that triggered the largest anti-slavery protest the nation had ever seen (includes dramatizations).

4:42pm

Sun February 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

Obscure Chagas' Disease Takes Costly Toll

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 4:11 pm

Don't let the name fool you. The kissing bug, or Rhodnius prolixus, transmits the Chagas parasite when it bites someone's face.
Erwin Huebner, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada Wikimedia.org

There's been a lot of talk recently about an old malady that seems to be on the rise.

It's called Chagas' disease, and it's transmitted by the so-called kissing bug, a bloodsucking insect that bites your face and lips.

Health economists have now put a price tag on the global cost of Chagas, and the illness is taking a heavier toll than previously appreciated.

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4:41pm

Sun February 10, 2013
The Two-Way

California State University Seeks Black Students From The Pews

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 1:25 pm

Students stand in the back row of a filled chemistry class at the California State University East Bay in Hayward, Calif., in September 2009. Officials from the Cal State system are seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews.
Eric Risberg AP

At church on Sundays, African-American students are hearing a possibly unexpected pitch alongside the familiar sermon: Come to Cal State University.

Officials from the California State University system have been pioneering a program of seeking new prospective African-American students in church pews — a program that's serving as a model for similar efforts elsewhere.

Blacks make up about 6.6 percent of California's population, according to 2011 census data. Jorge Haynes, a Cal State spokesman, said the university system's African-American population is 5 percent.

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3:58pm

Sun February 10, 2013
Space

Want To Create A Space Symphony? Wait For A Solar Storm

In photo from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, a major solar eruption is shown in progress Oct. 29, 2003. A large coronal mass ejection is being hurled toward the Earth.
NASA Getty Images

In 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick evokes the immense and powerful nature of outer space with Richard Strauss' score, Thus Spoke Zarathustra.

The music is now inextricably linked to the idea of space exploration. But what if, instead, you could create music from solar eruptions?

That's exactly what sonification specialist Robert Alexander does.

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