William Joyce

Moonbot Studios

“Ollie’s Odyssey” is the new book by Shreveport children’s author and illustrator William Joyce. It joins a shelf of more than 50 books he’s written and illustrated over his career. This one is almost 300 pages with dozens of full-page illustrations (the most he’s put in a novel, he thinks). It’s a chapter book geared to the grade-school set. 

William Joyce / Moonbot Studios

Moonbot Studios is offering autographed prints of Ollie's Odyssey as a thank you gift for a $100 contribution. Call now and reserve your copy. 800-552-8502

William Joyce has autographed these prints of Ollie, the main character in Ollie's Odyssey.

DONATE NOW!  Make sure to say you want the Ollie's Odyssey Print in the comments section.

Kate Archer Kent

A new 40-page "memoir" by Shreveport children’s author and illustrator William Joyce puts to rest a pressing question he’s fielded for years: What was your first book?

“It’s something I wrote in the fourth grade titled ‘Billy’s Booger: The Memoir of a Little Green Nose Buddy.’ People laugh or they cringe,” Joyce said.

The founder of Moonbot Studios revisits his entry in the fourth grade book writing contest at Shreveport’s A.C. Steere Elementary. The children’s book, published by Simon & Schuster, is inset with a recreation of the book that was his very first effort.

Shreveport author and illustrator William Joyce will receive a prestigious media award Thursday that coincides with the premiere of his new animated feature film that will debut in Shreveport.

Joyce will receive a Christopher Award  in New York.  His book, "The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore," will be recognized alongside other books, films, and television/cable shows that live up to the highest values of the human spirit, according to the Christophers.

Kate Archer Kent

A Gothic adventure video game is under development by Oscar-winning Moonbot Studios in Shreveport. Company officials have launched an online crowd-sourcing fundraiser through Kickstarter. They aim to raise $750,000, along with grassroots buzz from gamers. The game, “The Golem,” will be created entirely in-house by Moonbot’s 50 employees. At a Monday news conference, principal Brandon Oldenburg said the project was on the back burner for a couple years.