Texas

Airs Sunday, October 27 at 6 p.m. From KUT, Austin Public Radio, the world premiere of a new radio documentary, The Long Game: Texas’ Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom. Produced by Peabody award winner Trey Kay, Long Game delves into the culture war battles over public school curriculum content, which have ebbed and flowed in the Lone Star State for the past fifty years.

For more than a half a century, citizens of the Lone Star State have had intense, emotional battles over what children should and should not be taught in public school classrooms. While there have been fights over just about every academic subject, debates over history, evolution, God and country generate the most heat. Listen again here.

Aired Thursday, September 12 at 12 noon. Bill Beckett talks with Tracy Pinkerton, the Executive Director of the Arts Alliance about Rhythmic Circus: Feet Don’t Fail Me Now, the opening show in their new season at the Angelina Arts Alliance. For information about this and their entire season you can visit the Angelina Arts Alliance for details or call 936–633–5454.

Commentator Gary Joiner spotlights an East Texas town that is trapped in time -- in a good way. He calls Jefferson, Texas, a historian's jewel in the woods.

James Carroll

A 26-year-old independent petroleum landman in Carthage, Texas, has held 17 jobs in his life. LSU alumnus James Carroll was recently featured in a CNNMoney article about job-hunting millennials. It profiled 20-somethings from across the country who’ve held numerous jobs over relatively short periods in search of the ideal job. Carroll thinks he’s found his calling as a landman.

“I really enjoy it. It’s really challenging and dynamic. Every situation is different. We’re reviewing titles and deeds and determining ownership," Carroll said.

Events marking the 10th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster are being held across East Texas. Three days of events are under way in Hemphill, Texas. Belinda Gay, president of the Sabine County Columbia Memorial Committee, said Columbia is part of the fabric of her life. She was a volunteer searcher for wreckage and a meal coordinator for thousands of recovery workers who descended on her town. She said the Columbia disaster brought the space program into focus for her.

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