Politics

Commentator Brian O'Nuanain explores his views on guns and his fears spawned by the debate.

Airs Sunday, December 8 at 6 p.m. In this special program, you'll hear Nelson Mandela as you've never heard him before. This program draws on 50 hours of recorded conversations with Mandela, held for many years in Johannesburg by archivists at the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory. The man chosen to record Mandela's life story was Rick Stengel, a young reporter working in South Africa for Rolling Stone magazine. From 1992 to 1996, Stengel shadowed Mandela, using his small cassette machine to record the stories which would help in the writing of Mandela's autobiography, 'Long Walk to Freedom'. The program features extensive interviews with journalists and with Mandela himself, recounting growing up and his political activities, imprisonment and then ascent into the leadership of South Africa. The two other key voices in the documentary are the current managing editor of Time Magazine Rick Stengel and freelance radio producer Robin Benger. CBC Radio was the first radio network anywhere in the world to be given full access to these remarkable recordings.

Commentator Brian O'Nuanain is distraught and a little perplexed this morning over the plight of a close friend of his. 

Airs Sunday, July 21 at 6 p.m. 2012 was a disappointing year for Republicans.  The failure to win key swing states in the presidential election and surprising losses in the House and Senate has prompted some reflection.    Was their embrace of small government, low taxes, and a strong conservative stance on social issues at odds with shifting American demographics?  Or did the GOP embrace the right platform, but the wrong candidates?

Arguing for the motion are David Brooks, Op-Ed Columnist for The New York Times and Mickey Edwards, Former US Congressman (R) from Oklahoma. Arguing against the motion are Laura Ingraham, Host of The Laura Ingraham Show and Ralph Reed, Chairman of the Faith & Freedom Coalition.

Airs Sunday, May 19 at 6 p.m.  Does the internet poison politics? It's been argued that the rise of 'personalization,' the use of algorithms to filter what you see online, and easy access to the like-minded, have served to reinforce our pre-conceptions. Is the information bubble a myth, or is it undermining civic discourse? Is the rise of social media really broadening our world views, or narrowing them? The debaters are Eli Pariser, Siva Vaidhyanathan, Evgeny Morozov, and Jacob Weisberg.

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