Mussorgsky

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Airs Monday, March 27, 2017, at 1 p.m. This week on Carnegie Hall Live, The Vienna Philharmonic will take the stage under Valery Gergiev in a performance of Wagner's Overture to Der fliegende Holländer, La mer by Debussy, and Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky.

Airs Monday, February 20, 2017, at 1 p.m. This week on the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Charles Dutroit will lead the orchestra in Music by Stravinsky to open with a performance of the Jeu de cartes. Then cellist Gautier Capuçon will join maestro Dutroit for Elagar's Cello Concerto in E minor, Opus 85, and the concert will conclude with Ravles' orchestration of Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky. And from the archives we'll also hear music director Michael Tilson Thomas lead the orchestra in the Leonore Overture by Beethoven. 

Airs Thursday, August 13, at 1 p.m. This week on Carnegie Hall Live violinist Gil Shaham we'll join maestro David Robertson who will lead the National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America. Together they present a beautiful program featuring the Symphonic Dances from West Side Story by Bernstein, Britten's Violin Concerto, Op. 15, Radial Play by Samuel Adams, and Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky. 

Airs Thursday, September 18 at 11 a.m. The National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America is a phenomenal new group made up of 120 of the brightest young instrumentalists in our country. After a two-week residency of intensive rehearsals, they hit the road coast-to-coast this summer. Our program finds them in Carnegie Hall, led by the dynamic conductor David Robertson.

Airs Monday, July 14 at 11 a.m. On this week's broadcast concert from the Pittsburgh Symphony, music director Manfred Honeck returns to lead the orchestra in Modest Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain and Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7. In between, pianist Denis Matsuev will take the stage for Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2 and he'll also perform Improvisation of Billy Strayhorn and Duke Ellington’s “Take the A Train.”

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