Martin Luther King

Airs Wednesday, February 24, at 8 p.m. Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too often unsung African American cultural history. His inspiration comes from friendship of iconic collagist Romare Bearden and from the voices of the ancestors.

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Airs Monday, February 15, at 9 p.m. All Things Considered's Audie Cornish guest hosts this week’s Jazz Night in America episode. The tables turn as JNIA host Christian McBride -- Grammy Award winning bassist and composer -- talks about and performs his suite, The Movement Revisited, inspired by the words of Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali and Martin Luther King, Jr.   The performance was captured live at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, McBride's hometown.  

Airs Monday, February 23, at 8 p.m.  Illustrator Tracy Sugarman calls his art "reportorial" - he has specialized in capturing moments in history from D-Day to the moon landing. His latest book, Drawing Conclusions: An Artist Discovers His America is a memoir, with particular attention to his involvement in the civil rights movement. His portraits of historical figures like Martin Luther King, and illustrations of such events as the trial of the assassins of Malcolm X, bring an era to vivid life. Then... A conversation with award-winning journalist Charles E. Cobb Jr. In his book On the Road to Freedom: A Guided Tour of the Civil Rights Trail, Cobb takes us on a journey to places we thought we already knew. As a former organizer and field secretary for SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) Cobb was on the scene as history was being made. In this captivating conversation, he recalls the sights and sounds and backstage stories of events that changed the country. 

Airs Monday, January 18 at 8 p.m. Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.

Airs Sunday, January 19 at 6 p.m. In this hour-long special host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.  Martin Luther King grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

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