Louisiana Public Square

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Airs Sunday, April 3, at 6 p.m. If you’re currently accused of a crime in Louisiana but can’t afford to hire an attorney, you may literally be “Defense-less.” Public Defenders Offices in twelve Louisiana districts say they don’t have the resources to keep up with the demand for court-appointed attorneys. Six districts have put suspects on waiting lists for counsel.

Airs Sunday, January 31, at 6 p.m. What happens when police and the people they arrest have different versions of their encounters? Major cities in Louisiana are taking steps to try to solve that problem by equipping their officers with body cameras. So, how do they work and how expensive are they? How are communities covering their costs? Can body cameras deescalate volatile situations? And what privacy issues do they raise? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers on “Police POV: Body Cameras in Louisiana.”

Airs sunday, November 22, at 6 p.m. Nearly one-fifth of Louisianans live below the poverty line. For an individual, that means an income of less than $11,770 a year. A family of four brings in less than $24,250. What is living in poverty like? What factors cause such a high percentage of the state’s population to live under such conditions? What hurdles are there to escaping poverty and how can they be overcome? Why is the gap widening between those who have the most and those who have the least? Louisiana Public Square looks for answers on “Living Below the Line”

Airs Sunday, November 1, at 6 p.m. Access to quality early childhood education and childcare is the single biggest indicator of future academic success and worker retention. Louisiana passed legislation to restructure and improve early childhood options, but changes have been largely unfunded. How could the next governor and a newly elected Board of Elementary and Secondary Education alter the early childhood arena? If you have any children in child care, please join us Sunday night at 6 p.m.

Airs Sunday, August 2, at 6 p.m. The recent controversy in South Carolina over displaying the Confederate battle flag has sparked a dialog across the nation on the appropriateness and appropriate places for this icons of the Civil War Era. Is the display of Civil War statues and flags in public justified or do they belong only in museums? After the racially motivated violence in Charleston, South Carolina, state governments around the South are reevaluating the display of the Confederate battle flag on public grounds.

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