Louis Armstrong

Airs Monday, January 18, at 9 p.m."Dear Martin" is jazz tributes to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. King was a jazz fan, and eloquently expressed his admiration for the music in his opening remarks to the 1964 Berlin Jazz Festival.

Airs Thursday, October 29, at 8 p.m. Mark Shane plays classic jazz piano and his spirited "striding and tickling" combines ragtime feeling, blues, infectious humor, virtuosic technique and a time honored repertoire drawn from the golden age of jazz and swing. Listeners delight to hits made famous by Jelly Roll Morton, Fats Waller, Art Tatum, Duke Ellington, Teddy Wilson and other jazz greats. Mr.

Airs Monday, September 7 at 11 p.m. Work songs gave laborers a way of transforming their toil into something more meaningful, of enriching their everyday lives through music.  How did the influence of the work song emerge in the recordings of artists such as Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, Nat Adderley, Dave Brubeck and other musicians?  Jazz historian Ted Gioia, author of Work Songs, joins Night Lights for a Labor Day look at the work song's relationship to jazz and popular music.

Airs Monday, April 6, at 1 p.m. Violinist Itzhak Perlman and Klezmer Conservatory Band founder Hankus Netsky join WCRB's James David Jacobs to share music and memories of Passover from diverse traditions.  The gathering together of Jews every springtime to retell the story of their flight from Egypt might be the longest-running yearly cultural event in the history of humankind, and one that has inspired many different musical traditions.

Airs Friday, February 6, at 9 p.m. Antonio Garcia (Virginia Commonwealth University) says that the personal and professional lives of musicians such as Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane cannot be divorced from the struggle for racial equality—they contributed in significant ways to interracial understanding and social progress.  Also featured: The composers of the Civil Rights anthem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” also created musical theater at the turn of the century, transforming the image of African American characters and performers.

Pages