Kurt Weill

Airs Tuesday, February 9 at 10 p.m. Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.

Airs Wednesday, February 18, at 9 p.m. Langston Hughes, an enduring icon of the Harlem Renaissance, is best-known for his written work, which wedded his fierce dedication to social justice with his belief in the transformative power of the word. But he was a music lover, too, and some of the works he was most proud of were collaborations with composers and musicians.

Hosted by Terrance McKnight, WQXR host and former Morehouse professor of music, I, Too, Sing America will dive into the songs, cantatas, musicals and librettos that flowed from Hughes’ pen. As he did with his poetry, Hughes used music to denounce war, combat segregation and restore human dignity in the face of Jim Crow. His musical adventures included writing lyrics for stage pieces such as Black Nativity and Tambourines to Glory, works that helped give birth to the genre of Gospel Play, as well as songs for radio plays and political campaigns, and the libretto for Kurt Weill’s Street Songs.

Airs Tuesday, July 4 at 2 p.m. After fleeing Nazi Germany, Kurt Weill came to the United States in 1935. The music he subsequently wrote in this country was important in the development of American musical theater. After Weill's death in 1950, his wife Lotte Lenya devoted herself almost exclusively to his music and established the Kurt Weill Foundation in 1962.
     To mark the 85th anniversary of Weill's best-know work, The Threepenny Opera, and the 15th anniversary of the Lotte Lenya Competition for young musical theater singers, Fascinatin' Rhythm host Michael Lasser will be joined by Kurt Weill Scholar and Foundation President Kim Kowalke for a series of three special programs that explore the composer's place in American popular music.
     The programs will explore Kurt Weill's American Songs, Kurt Weill and Popular Singers, and Kurt Weill's American Lyricists. Kurt Weill, American is funded in part by the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Inc., New York, NY.

Airs Tuesday, July 3 at 2 p.m.  After fleeing Nazi Germany, Kurt Weill came to the United States in 1935. The music he subsequently wrote in this country was important in the development of American musical theater. After Weill's death in 1950, his wife Lotte Lenya devoted herself almost exclusively to his music and established the Kurt Weill Foundation in 1962.

Airs Tuesday, July 2 at 2 p.m.  After fleeing Nazi Germany, Kurt Weill came to the United States in 1935. The music he subsequently wrote in this country was important in the development of American musical theater. After Weill's death in 1950, his wife Lotte Lenya devoted herself almost exclusively to his music and established the Kurt Weill Foundation in 1962.
     To mark the 85th anniversary of Weill's best-know work, The Threepenny Opera, and the 15th anniversary of the Lotte Lenya Competition for young musical theater singers, Fascinatin' Rhythm host Michael Lasser will be joined by Kurt Weill Scholar and Foundation President Kim Kowalke for a series of three special programs that explore the composer's place in American popular music.
     The programs will explore Kurt Weill's American Songs, Kurt Weill and Popular Singers, and Kurt Weill's American Lyricists. Kurt Weill, American is funded in part by the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Inc., New York, NY.

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