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Airs Tuesday, April 24, 2018, at 7:45 a.m. This week Commentator Dr. Gary Joiner explore the life, service, and valor of First Lieutenant William R. Lawley, Jr. History Matters is made possible in part by the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities and Louisiana Cultural Vistas Magazine. 

Press Image / WQXR & WNYC

Airs Monday, January 15, 2018, at 9 p.m. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause. Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause. Terrance McKnight is WQXR's Evening Host. He came to WQXR from WNYC, which he joined in 2008. He brings to his position wide and varied musical experience that includes performance, teaching and radio broadcast. An accomplished pianist, McKnight was also a member of the Morehouse College faculty, where he taught music appreciation and applied piano.

Press Image / WQXR and WNYC

Airs Monday, February 20, 2017, at 11 a.m. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause. Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

NPR / NPR

Airs Monday, February 13, 2017, at 9 p.m. All Things Considered's Audi Cornish guest hosts this week’s Jazz Night in America episode. The tables turn as JNIA host Christian McBride -- Grammy Award winning bassist and composer -- talks about and performs his suite, The Movement Revisited, inspired by the words of Rosa Parks, Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali and Martin Luther King, Jr. The performance was captured live at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, McBride's hometown.

Press Image / WQXR and WNYC

Airs Monday, January 16, at 11 a.m. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.  Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

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