Airs Sunday, August 2, at 6 p.m. The recent controversy in South Carolina over displaying the Confederate battle flag has sparked a dialog across the nation on the appropriateness and appropriate places for this icons of the Civil War Era. Is the display of Civil War statues and flags in public justified or do they belong only in museums? After the racially motivated violence in Charleston, South Carolina, state governments around the South are reevaluating the display of the Confederate battle flag on public grounds.

Commentator Brian O'Nuanain discuss trivia and the non-trivial and which he feels we should focus on.

Airs Saturday, April 4 at 9:00 p.m.  A documentary exploring why we sing music at church and what it does for individuals and communities. Church music is one of the few pure forms of human expression. Just a person, their voice, and the belief that compassion is self-fulfilling and will birth more compassion. Here in a one-hour special we explore the many kinds of church music in America. The culture and the people behind the voices. Who sings and why, and what those songs say about our country.

A Minden, La., historian has a new book of vintage photographs of his hometown. John A. Agan accumulated photos of Minden’s heritage over several decades. The book is titled “Lost Minden” because the town sustained a number of devastating fires, according to Agan. At the turn of the 20th century, a city ordinance banned wooden structures in its downtown. Agan says his book captures the businesses, town celebrations, storefronts and back streets that otherwise only remain in memories.

Airs Monday, February 16, at 11 p.m. In the late 1960s, when trumpeter Miles Davis was leading his famous Second Quintet, saxophonist Wayne Shorter wrote a series of large ensemble works. They were never recorded, only was performed, and many people never knew they existed. Sometime around the quintet disbanding, Shorter put the scores away.