Airs Sunday, October 27 at 6 p.m. From KUT, Austin Public Radio, the world premiere of a new radio documentary, The Long Game: Texas’ Ongoing Battle for the Direction of the Classroom. Produced by Peabody award winner Trey Kay, Long Game delves into the culture war battles over public school curriculum content, which have ebbed and flowed in the Lone Star State for the past fifty years.

For more than a half a century, citizens of the Lone Star State have had intense, emotional battles over what children should and should not be taught in public school classrooms. While there have been fights over just about every academic subject, debates over history, evolution, God and country generate the most heat. Listen again here.

Airs, Sunday, October 20 at 6 p.m.  A national report says Louisiana charter school students learn faster than their peers in traditional public schools. That’s not the case, though, if those charters are in suburban or rural parishes. There  are over 100 charter schools throughout the state with the nation’s largest percentage of public charter school students in New Orleans. So, how effective are charter schools in Louisiana? Are they  delivering promised educational dividends or putting taxpayers’ dollars at risk? And when measuring success, do charter schools compete with traditional public schools on a level playing field in the  areas of admissions and accountability?

Airs Sunday, October 13 at 6 p.m. This program documents how the GED – originally designed to help World War II veterans go to college – became the fallback option for millions of high school dropouts. It explores how the GED is changing and what those changes mean for millions of Americans being left behind by our changing economy. 

Airs Sunday, October 6 at 6 p.m. Experts say technology creates new ways for schools to customize education for each student. This program documents the rise of so-called “personalized learning.” It takes listeners to schools that are reinventing their approach to education, and explores how teaching and learning change when personalization replaces one-size-fits-all in the classroom. 

Commentator Brian O'Nuanain travels back to the time of Rousseau, and part one of a long at his futuristic visions on education.