Debates

6:00pm

Sun December 15, 2013
Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. - Should we break up the big banks?

Airs Sunday, December 15 at 6 p.m. To prevent the collapse of the global financial system in 2008, The Treasury committed 245 billion in taxpayer dollars to stabilize America’s banking institutions. Today, banks that were once “too big to fail” have only grown bigger. Were size and complexity at the root of the financial crisis, or do calls to break up the big banks ignore real benefits that only economies of scale can pass on to customers and investors? Arguing for the motion are Richard Fisher, President & CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and Simon Johnson, Professor of Entrepreneurship at MIT. Arguing against the motion are Douglas Elliott, a Fellow in Economics Studies at the Brookings Institution and Paul Salzman, President of the Clearing House association.

11:00am

Sat July 20, 2013
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Intelligence Squared U.S. - The GOP must seize the center or die?

Airs Sunday, July 21 at 6 p.m. 2012 was a disappointing year for Republicans.  The failure to win key swing states in the presidential election and surprising losses in the House and Senate has prompted some reflection.    Was their embrace of small government, low taxes, and a strong conservative stance on social issues at odds with shifting American demographics?  Or did the GOP embrace the right platform, but the wrong candidates?

Arguing for the motion are David Brooks, Op-Ed Columnist for The New York Times and Mickey Edwards, Former US Congressman (R) from Oklahoma. Arguing against the motion are Laura Ingraham, Host of The Laura Ingraham Show and Ralph Reed, Chairman of the Faith & Freedom Coalition.

6:00pm

Sun June 2, 2013
Intelligence Squared U.S.

Intelligence Squared US: America Doesn't Need a Strong Dollar Policy

Airs Sunday, June 2 at 6 p.m.  It’s often taken for granted that America needs a strong dollar.  When the value of the U.S. dollar is strong relative to other currencies, it becomes attractive to investors and allows Americans to buy foreign goods and services cheaply.  But in times of recession, are we better off with a weak dollar that stimulates U.S. manufacturing by making our goods cheaper and more competitive?  Or will the loss of purchasing power and currency manipulation abroad, offset the potential gains?