Debate

Airs Thursday, October 19, 2017, at 6 p.m. Criticized by patients, providers, and politicians alike, the United States healthcare system is hardly a crowd-pleaser. Is the most expensive health care system in the world beyond repair? The debaters are Shannon Brownlee, Dr. Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Dr. Robert Pearl, and Dr. David T. Feinberg

Intelligence Squared U.S. / Intelligence Squared U.S.

Airs Sunday, October 15, 2017, at 6 p.m. Against the backdrop of North Korea's nuclear advances and escalating regional tensions, we ask: How should the U.S. respond to its most urgent national security threats? Staged with our new "Unresolved" debate format, the debaters argue for or against a number of motions including: Is Donald Trump making China great again? Is China destined for regional dominance? And can we strike a deal with Beijing to contain North Korea’s nuclear program? The debaters are Ian Bremmer, Elizabeth Economy, Noah Feldman, and David Shambaugh.

Press Image / NPR

Airs Wednesday, October 19, at 8 p.m. Presidential Debate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Airs Sunday, January 11 at 6 p.m. Income inequality has been on the rise for decades. In the last 30 years, the wages of the top 1% have grown by 154%, while the bottom 90% has seen growth of only 17%. As the rungs of the economic ladder move further and further apart, conventional wisdom says that it will become much more difficult to climb them. Opportunities for upward mobility—the American dream—will disappear as the deck becomes stacked against the middle class and the poor. But others see inequality as a positive, a sign of a dynamic and robust economy that, in the end, helps everyone. And contrary to public opinion, mobility has remained stable over the past few decades. If the American dream is dying, is it the result of income inequality? Or is disparity in income a red herring where more complex issues are at play?

Arguing for the motion: Arguing for the motion: Elise Gould, Senior Economist and Director of Health Policy Research at the Economic Policy Institute; and Nick Hanauer, Entrepreneur & Venture Capitalist.

Arguing against the motion: Edward Conard, Visiting Scholar with AEI & Former Partner with Bain Capital; and Scott Winship, Fellow with the Manhattan Institute.

Airs Sunday, September 29 at 6 p.m. Remotely piloted aircraft, or drones, have been the centerpiece of America’s counter terrorism toolkit since the start of the Obama presidency, and the benefits have been clear. Their use has significantly weakened al Qaeda and the Taliban while keeping American troops out of harm’s way. But critics of drone strikes argue that the short-term gains do not outweigh the long-term consequences—among them, radicalization of a public outraged over civilian deaths. Is our drone program hurting, or helping, in the fight against terrorism?

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