Cultural, Community, Information

Red River Radio presents cultural specials throughout the year. Holiday specials, programs on music, theatre, and the arts. We also air documentaries on a wide range of subjects from sciences and politics, to history and our changing communities  . Red River Radio is your source for Great Music, In Depth News, and much more.

Airs Friday, April 3, at 2 p.m.  Renowned actor Theodore Bikel and The Western Wind, America's pre-eminent vocal ensemble, present 25 eclectic selections that, along with an inspring narration, serve as musical documentary of Passover. Music includes Hebrew folk melodies, classical European liturgical music, ancient Sephardic chants, Klezmer-style improvisations, and traditional songs from the Seder. This program is designed for listeners of any religious background and provides a good introduction to a holiday whose lessons of redemption and faith are universal. "The music is an eclectic compilation of songs and compositions from many sources reflecting the tremendous diversity of Jewish cultures. Selections include Hebrew folk melodies, classical European liturgical music, ancient Sephardic chants, Klezmer-style improvisations, and traditional songs from the Seder, including the 'adopted' song of slavery, the Negro spiritual "Go Down Moses"--all sung with the superb musicianship and zest that are hallmarks of Western Wind performances." Miami Jewish Journal.

Airs Friday, April 3 at 12 noon. Music of the Baroque and the WFMT Radio Network are pleased to offer Bach's Passion According to St. John, a Holy Week Special conducted by Jane Glover. In this intimate, intensely dramatic, and deeply human telling of the Passion narrative, J.S. Bach sets scripture and poetry in music of heartbreaking emotion and beauty. Scottish tenor Paul Agnew, whom the Chicago Tribune calls "simply miraculous," returns this season to sing the Evangelist in one of the greatest choral works of all time.

Music of the Baroque was founded in Hyde Park, Illinois, 36 years ago by Conductor Laureate Thomas S. From its church choir roots, Music of the Baroque has grown to be the Midwest’s largest professional chorus and orchestra specializing in the performance of sixteenth, seventeenth and early eighteenth century music. Over the past three decades, the ensemble has brought Chicago audiences their first, and in some cases, only performances of many early masterpieces – among them, Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo, Telemann’s Day of Judgment, Mozart’s Idomeneo and numerous Handel operas and oratorios.

The chorus and orchestra of Music of the Baroque comprise of approximately 60 professional musicians. Chorus members have active operatic and recital careers and many perform regularly, both in the United States and abroad. Many members of the Music of the Baroque Orchestra are also members of other leading ensembles, including the Chicago Symphony and Lyric Opera orchestras. In this intimate, intensely dramatic, and deeply human telling of the Passion narrative, J. S. Bach sets scripture and poetry in music of heartbreaking emotion and beauty. Scottish tenor Paul Agnew, whom the Chicago Tribune calls “simply miraculous,” returns to sing the Evangelist in one of the greatest choral works of all time.

Bach’s Passion According to St. John will be conducted by Jane Glover. The soloists include Paul Agnew, Nathan Berg, Yulia Van Doren, Krisztina Szabó, Todd von Felker, Susan Nelson, Klaus Georg, Ryan O’Mealey, and the Music of the Baroque Chorus and Orchestra.

Airs Thursday, April 2, at 8 p.m. Nearly every year since 2004, the Savannah Music Festival has lined up four different jazz pianists in a concert that showcases not only their individual talent, but also their ability to perform duets with each of the other pianists on the bill. This episode features highlights from Piano Showdown 2014 with Christian Sands, Aaron Diehl, Marcus Roberts, and Cyrus Chestnut. Part one of two.

Airs Thursday, April 2, at 7 p.m. This special is a new production in a series of a conversation about Passover, one of the most important and most beloved holidays on the Jewish calendar. Larry Josephson, a secular Jew who now wants to know more about the religion of his grandparents, asks Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, to explain the meaning of Passover in a post-9/11 world. Dr. Schorsch tells Larry the story of Passover -- its history, rituals and foods, and the origins and structure of the Seder. The music of Passover, sung by some of the best cantors and choirs in the world, is artfully woven in and out of the conversation. The music was chosen by Cantor Marcia Tilchin, the Associate Producer. The program was developed and produced by Larry Josephson, and edited and mixed by Peter Zanger.

Aired Thursday, April 2, at 6 p.m. Around 88,000 people in the U.S. die from alcohol related causes annually. In 2012, 17 million adults reportedly had an alcohol use problem, with 1.4 million receiving treatment at a specialized facility. This week on Health Matters, Dr. Paul Wilson, Internal Medicine Specialist, and Bill Rose, Executive Director of CADA, were our guests. A special guest joined them to share their experience with alcoholism from the viewpoint of a family member.  Your calls were taken during the show at 1-800-552-8502.


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