Chris Keating

Country music icon and Texas native Ray Price will be honored in a new exhibit that opens Saturday at the Texas Country Music Hall of Fame in Carthage. Price died in 2013 in Mount Pleasant, Texas, at the age of 87.

Artifacts set to go on display include some of Price’s Nudie suits.  These were the decorative rhinestone-covered suits – custom-made couture for the icon who defined two major eras of country music, according to Carthage Chamber of Commerce president Tommie Ritter Smith.


Panola College in Carthage, Texas, will open its first large-scale exhibit Wednesday. 

The exhibit, “Spirited: Prohibition in America,” is organized by the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and made possible through the National Endowment for the Humanities’ On the Road Initiative.

Panola’s library services director Cristie Ferguson says the exhibit came in 21 crates, and many people at the college had a hand in setting it up. They cleared almost the entire first floor of Panola's M.P. Baker Library to make room for it.

Carthage, Texas, plans to nearly double the size of its Texas Country Music Hall of Fame that opened in 1998. Groundbreaking for the $1.1 million expansion is set for Wednesday. 

Tommie Ritter Smith runs the museum and is president of Carthage's chamber of commerce. She says it’s been a challenge to display memorabilia from all 50 current inductees.

“We just ran out of room! We’ve got to expand to continue honoring Texas country music legends. So, the city is adding on 3,000 square feet to our already existing about 4,000 square feet of display space," Ritter Smith said.

Officials at Panola College in Carthage, Texas, urge hundreds of students to finish their high school equivalency test and buckle down this summer to prepare for it. The GED has been overhauled. The changeover to the new test will occur in January. Students who haven’t passed all portions of the current GED by then will have to start over again.

James Carroll

A 26-year-old independent petroleum landman in Carthage, Texas, has held 17 jobs in his life. LSU alumnus James Carroll was recently featured in a CNNMoney article about job-hunting millennials. It profiled 20-somethings from across the country who’ve held numerous jobs over relatively short periods in search of the ideal job. Carroll thinks he’s found his calling as a landman.

“I really enjoy it. It’s really challenging and dynamic. Every situation is different. We’re reviewing titles and deeds and determining ownership," Carroll said.