Bossier City

AVC Conventions

Louisiana’s first comic con convention is coming to the Bossier Civic Center in Bossier City next month. Organizers expect more than 2,000 people will turn out dressed like their favorite movie and comic book characters – think Star Wars. They’re bound to find like-minded fans, according to Greg Hanks, owner of Mississippi-based AVC Conventions.

“You could call it like a nerd market,” Hanks said. “They’re more about movies, television and comic books. It runs the gamut of culture that relates to popular things.”

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President Jimmy Carter gave the keynote address Thursday as part of a tribute event at Municipal Auditorium that marked the 20th anniversary of Shreveport-based charity Community Renewal International. Carter was moved by musical acts, including the Shreveport Community Church Singers and the Centenary College Choir.

Kate Archer Kent

More than 100 job seekers turned out for the fall veterans job and resource fair held Thursday morning at the Bossier Civic Center.

Jason Schofield will retire next month after a 20-year career in the U.S. Air Force. Recently, he sent out 20 resumes and filled out as many applications in anticipation of his next chapter in life.

He appreciates a job fair geared toward the military, but he says there are many more companies seeking workers who were not at this job fair.

The Brain Injury Association of Louisiana opened its two-day conference Thursday in Bossier City, attracting more than 100 survivors, caregivers, and medical experts. 

The opening day presentations will focus on brain and spinal cord injury survivor stories, along with demonstrations of the latest assistive technology, according to association executive director Tommy Lotz. He says there is much to discuss about how the brain reacts to an injury, and he wants to convey that there’s room for optimism after tragedy.

Kate Archer Kent

The Friends of the Red River National Wildlife Refuge will host a public event Monday that will explore the night sounds on the refuge in Bossier City. Owls, frogs, and crickets are just part of the nighttime chorus, according to refuge ranger Terri Jacobson. In the spring, Jacobson said, the wildlife sounds intensify.

“The animals are waking up and starting to call and sing and make noise as they’re gathering courtship, pairing up, getting together to create families for the spring," Jacobson said.