Black History

Airs Monday, February 3 at 9 p.m. Today's Modern Gospel has evolved into a distinct art-form as musical legends incorporated the popular music of their day (i.e. blues, soul, jazz and hip-hop) into Gospel performances, making the message accessible to each new generation.  In some cases, Gospel hits lived for months at the top of Pop Charts and Gospel Charts simultaneously. Gospel Greats shares the stories and music of some of the artists who have had the greatest impact on the evolution of the art-form.  The span of the show is broad, covering composers (like Thomas Dorsey, the Father of Gospel Music), soloists (like Mahalia Jackson), quintets and quartets (like The Caravans, The Clark Sisters and The Williams Brothers) and those who have orchestrated great choirs to blend in new urban sounds (like James Cleveland, Edwin Hawkins, Andre Crouch and Kirk Franklin). Hosted by jazz pianist Cyrus Chestnut. 

Part 2 airs Tuesday, February 4 at 9 p.m.  Part 3 airs Wednesday, February 5 at 9 p.m.

Airs Tuesday, February 4 at 9 p.m. Today's Modern Gospel has evolved into a distinct art-form as musical legends incorporated the popular music of their day (i.e. blues, soul, jazz and hip-hop) into Gospel performances, making the message accessible to each new generation.  In some cases, Gospel hits lived for months at the top of Pop Charts and Gospel Charts simultaneously. Gospel Greats shares the stories and music of some of the artists who have had the greatest impact on the evolution of the art-form.

Airs Monday, January 20 at 1 p.m.  Join the world renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir for a Celebration of a "Lasting Heritage" and "Heart & soul" in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. They will perform Gently Raise the Sacred Strain, I'm Runnin' On, Peace Like a River, Every Time I Feel the Spirit, I Want Jesus to Walk with Me, Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham, As the Dew from Heaven Distilling and many more. 

Airs Sunday, January 19 at 6 p.m. In this hour-long special host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.  Martin Luther King grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

Airs Saturday, February 16 at 8:00 p.m.  As musicians migrated north following the close of Storyville, New Orleans infamous red-light district, many found their way to the newly revitalized city on the north shore of the Harlem River. This program feature a cross section of their music and stories.

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