Black History Month Specials 2013

10:00pm

Fri February 15, 2013
Buddy Guy

Buddy Guy: Can't Quit the Blues

Airs Friday, February 15 at 10 p.m. Brand new one-hour music intensive radio special features legendary bluesman Buddy Guy in his own words and music. Buddy Guy's own comments come from an exclusive interview session, and include many recollections and insights that will heard on your station for the first time. 

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9:00pm

Fri February 15, 2013
Breaking

Sam Cooke: Bring it on Home Special

Airs Friday, February 15 at 9 p.m. This documentary details the life and music of Sam Cooke through his own recordings and commentary his friends, family and friends. This program features music from throughout his career that displays the great breadth of his talent before his tragic death in 1964 at the age of 33 - from his gospel roots to his upbeat classic hits, and from his high energy live concerts to his recordings of late-night mood pieces. Interview subjects include R&B legend Bobby Womack, Sam's brother L.C. Cooke, and drummer Hal Blaine.

11:00am

Wed February 13, 2013
Mormon Tabernacle Choi

A Lasting Heritage & Songs for the Soul with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir

Alex Boyé

Airs Thursday, February 14 at 11:00 a.m. Join the renowned Mormon Tabernacle Choir in the Celebration of African American history and culture with traditional African-American Spirituals such as I'm Runnin' On, Peace Like a River, Every Time I Feel the Spirit, Rock-a-My Soul in the Bosom of Abraham, Deep River, Let Us Break Bread Together, Down to the River to Pray, and works by Thomas C. Griggs and Joseph J. Daynes. Special guest Alex Boyé will be featured.

9:00pm

Mon February 11, 2013
Music for Martin

Music for Martin: Luis Perdomo Solo Piano on MLK Holiday 2013

Airs Monday, February 11 at 9 p.m.  This past Martin Luther King Holiday (January, 2013) Venezuelan pianist Luis Perdomo performed live at the Bank of America Plaza in downtown Los Angeles in honor of Dr. King. Producer Jim Luce shares the live recording of this solo performance, mixed with Luis' own comments about his introduction to the Civil Rights Movement, and his own musical journey from his home in Caracas, to the jazz capital of the world, New York City. 

6:00pm

Sun February 10, 2013
Justice Denied

Human Kind: Justice Denied

Airs Sunday, February 10 at 6 p.m.  How could a nation founded on a Declaration that proclaimed "all men are created equal" permit slavery? Nowhere was this contradiction more stark than in federal courts. In this one-hour Humankind special, we'll consider several historical flashpoints, which forced the judicial issues. In one case, historians, legal scholars and actors re-create the fugitive slave trial of Anthony Burns, a teenager born a slave in Virginia who escaped to freedom in Boston. The federal court proceedings that followed his arrest and court-ordered return to slavery provoked the largest abolitionist protest the nation had ever seen. We also look in-depth at the most controversial ruling in the history of the U.S. Supreme Court -- the Dred Scott case, which held that blacks had "no rights which the white man was bound to respect." We examine how these cases aggravated tensions before the Civil War, stirred up abolitionist sentiment and harmed the legitimacy of the courts.
     With historians including Columbia University’s Eric Foner, who won the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for his book, ‘The Fiery Trial – Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery’, we examine the pre-Civil War role that U.S. federal courts played in upholding slavery. We consider the notorious Dred Scott ruling, in which the Supreme Court held that blacks have no rights that whites must respect, as well as a historic fugitive slave case in Boston that triggered the largest anti-slavery protest the nation had ever seen (includes dramatizations).

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