3-D Printer

Kate Archer Kent

Researchers at LSU Health Shreveport and Louisiana Tech University in Ruston are in the early stages of developing a new way to deliver antibiotics and other medicine via customized, implantable devices created using a 3-D printer. 

LSU Medical School student Jeffery Weisman is also pursuing his doctorate in biomedical engineering from Louisiana Tech. He presented his research in collaboration with LSU Health Shreveport. It intensified over the past three months when he experimented with making plastic medical prototypes from a consumer-grade 3-D printer.

Kate Archer Kent

There are a handful of 3-D printers in the Shreveport/Bossier area, and all are being put to different uses, according to the head of LSU Shreveport's animation and digital effects program. John Miralles purchased one several years ago through a grant. He said it’s enhancing the skill set of his students. The printer uses heated plastic in a layering process to turn his students’ computer designs into real objects.

"We’re doing creative projects with an engineering-grade technology," Miralles said, as he peered into the printer's viewing window that resembles a convection oven.