Weekend All Things Considered

Weekends at 4pm
Guy Raz
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4:47pm

Sat September 14, 2013
All Tech Considered

Musical Robots Take The Stage For Harmony, Not Domination

Originally published on Sun September 15, 2013 4:38 pm

Stickboy, Compressorhead's four-armed drummer rocks out in front of thousands of fans at the Big Day Out music festival.
Shar Try ekto23

4:32pm

Sat September 14, 2013
NPR Story

New York Underground: Exploring City Caves And Catacombs

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 5:15 pm

Urban explorer Steve Duncan goes underground, examining the hidden infrastructure of major cities all over the world: their tunnels, subways and sewers. Late in 2010, NPR's Jacki Lyden joined Duncan and a group of subterranean adventurers in New York. (This story originally aired on All Things Considered on Jan. 2, 2011.)

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4:32pm

Sat September 14, 2013
NPR Story

For Rich NFL Players, Do Fines Matter?

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 5:15 pm

The NFL has fined Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh $100,000 for an illegal low block behind an opponent's knee. Suh, twice voted the league's "dirtiest player" by fellow players in a Sporting News poll, is appealing the fine, the largest ever for on-the-field conduct. The question for Suh and fellow athletes is whether fines change behavior.

4:32pm

Sat September 14, 2013
NPR Story

In Flooded Colorado, Rescue Amid The Rain

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 5:15 pm

Hundreds of people have been evacuated from flooded areas of Colorado, which on Saturday saw a brief break in heavy rain. But with more rain in the forecast, lives and homes remain in danger.

4:58pm

Fri September 13, 2013
Shots - Health News

After Disasters, DNA Science Is Helpful, But Often Too Pricey

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 6:32 pm

A Thai medic checks bodies for forensic identity in Phang Nga province in southern of Thailand on Jan. 11, 2005. Thousands of people were killed in Thailand after a massive tsunami struck on Dec. 26, 2004.
Pornchai Kittiwongsakul AFP/Getty Images

Human DNA is the ultimate fingerprint. A single hair can contain enough information to determine someone's identity — a feature that's been invaluable for identifying the unnamed casualties of natural disasters and war. But forensic scientists who use DNA say the technology isn't always available where it's most needed, like in poor countries, or in war zones like Syria.

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