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2:29am

Tue September 25, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Medicaid Remarks On '60 Minutes' Raise Eyebrows

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 3:21 pm

Mitt Romney talks with 60 Minutes correspondent Scott Pelley.
AP

It's not so much what Mitt Romney said about whether the government should guarantee people health care in his interview on CBS's 60 Minutes Sunday that has health care policy types buzzing. It's how that compares to what he has said before.

To back up a bit, Scott Pelley asked the former Massachusetts governor if he thinks "the government has a responsibility to provide health care to the 50 million Americans who don't have it today?"

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2:28am

Tue September 25, 2012
Fine Art

Print-Inspired Art: All The News That's Fit To Paint

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Alfredo Ramos Martinez painted Head of a Nun, tempera on newspaper, in 1934.
Gerard Vuilleumier The Alfredo Ramos Martinez Research Project, Reproduced by Permission

The print newspaper industry may be struggling, but newsprint is alive and well on the walls of a new exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The show is called "Shock of the News" — and it examines a century's worth of interaction between artists and the journals of their day.

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2:27am

Tue September 25, 2012
Business

Chicago Pits Quieter, But Traders' Outcries Linger

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 7:18 pm

Traders work in the bond pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1995. In recent decades, much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.
Michael S. Green AP

The trading pits at the Chicago Board of Trade and the Mercantile Exchange have long been potent symbols of American capitalism. And they used to be as rough and tumble as the city itself, where burly men bought and sold commodities like hogs, cattle, corn and soybeans.

Trading volume has gone up considerably in recent years, but Chicago's trading pits are tamer places today — the result of a revolution futures trading has undergone over the past quarter century. Much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.

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11:03pm

Mon September 24, 2012
The Record

Crowd Funding For Musicians Isn't The Future; It's The Present

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:24 pm

The Physics, with Thig Nat at the right.
Courtesy of the artists

By now, everyone's heard of Kickstarter, the website that lets people with an idea or project ask other people to contribute toward realizing it. It's called crowd funding, and this summer's big success story was musician Amanda Palmer. She raised more than $1 million to produce her new album. But crowd funding doesn't work for every musician every time.

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10:13am

Mon September 24, 2012
Monkey See

Making A Comedy Pilot? You Might Want To Call James Burrows

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:41 pm

In a 2001 photo, actress Debra Messing and director James Burrows pose together after Burrows won a Directors Guild of America award for directing the pilot of Will & Grace.
Chris Weeks Getty Images

"It's staggering."

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