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Morning Edition,  NPR's premiere morning. 

Marketplace Morning Report at 4:50, 6:50 and 8:50
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History Matters at 7:35 on Tuesday
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4:53am

Tue October 23, 2012
Strange News

A Captive Beluga Whale's Remarkably Human Song

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a tale of the singing whale. Scientists this week published a study of a captive beluga whale in San Diego. The whale began to sing, apparently after spending time close to people. It died several years ago, but left behind a recording that sounds like a person in the shower.

(SOUNDBITE OF WHALE SINGING)

INSKEEP: We do not know if during his lifetime the singing whale ever made it to a karaoke bar.

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4:53am

Tue October 23, 2012
Strange News

Bridge Designers Envision Giant Trampolines

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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3:58am

Tue October 23, 2012
Asia

Malala Isn't Alone: Another Pakistani Girl's Dream

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 7:18 pm

Pakistani security personnel stand guard in front of a burnt-out school following an attack by the Pakistani Taliban in the northwestern district of Upper Dir in June 2011. The Taliban have destroyed many schools in northwestern Pakistan.
AFP Getty Images

Stop someone in the street. Ask them about the case of Malala Yousafzai. They will likely know — after the worldwide publicity given to her story — that Malala is the Pakistani teenager who was shot for demanding the right of girls to go to school.

They will surely know, too, that the people who shot Malala in the head from close range were the Pakistani Taliban. They will probably view Malala as the heroine she clearly is. And the Taliban will be seen as the violent fanatics that they surely are.

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3:38am

Tue October 23, 2012
All Tech Considered

Microsoft, An Empire Under Siege, Makes Its Next Moves

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:49 pm

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer speaks at a Microsoft event in San Francisco in July. This week, Microsoft launches Windows 8, a radical redesign of its operating system, as well as a new set of tablet computers.
Jeff Chiu AP

Microsoft, the company that defined the PC, is still enormously profitable — but not as profitable as it once was.

This week, Microsoft will try to regroup. It is rolling out the largest upgrade of its Windows software in more than a decade. All of this is meant to help the company break into the exploding market for mobile.

While the company still commands a formidable computing empire, it is now under attack.

Microsoft's CEO is Steve Ballmer, a big, bombastic, balding guy. These days he's riled up about Windows 8.

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3:38am

Tue October 23, 2012
Author Interviews

Running Toward Redemption On 'Ransom Road'

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 4:53 am

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Meet a man with a powerful addiction — to running. Caleb Daniloff says he believes the sport saved him from addictions that were far worse, and he's written a new book, called Running Ransom Road: Confronting the Past, One Marathon at a Time, about his experiences.

Daniloff has run some familiar marathons — New York and Boston — but he's also been to a place not famous for outdoor running: Moscow.

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