Morning Edition

Weekdays 4am to 9am
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep, and Kate Archer Kent

Morning Edition,  NPR's premiere morning. 

Marketplace Morning Report at 4:50, 6:50 and 8:50
A Moment of Science at 6:36
Get It Growing at 7:19
Earth and Sky at 7:33
History Matters at 7:35 on Tuesday
Eco Tech Minute at 7:33 Wednesday's
What Was I Thinking at 7:35 on Thursday
Dr. Archie McDonald's Commentary at 7:35 on Friday

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187c8b4e1c86bcc976c2354|5187c825e1c86bcc976c2210

Pages

2:18am

Tue March 19, 2013
Around the Nation

Historian Propels Connecticut To Claim 'First In Flight'

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 7:35 pm

Gustave Whitehead and the No. 21. Connecticut claims that Whitehead's half-mile flight in 1901 was the first flight, not the well-known Wright brothers' flight that occurred two years later.
Courtesy Deutsches Flugpioniermuseum Gustav Weisskopf Leutershausen/Historical Flight Research Committee Gustave Whitehead

The ongoing battle between historians over who was really first in flight was rekindled last week.

New research advances the theory that a German immigrant in Connecticut is responsible for the first powered and controlled flight, rather than the Wright brothers in North Carolina.

But historians at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum are saying not so fast.

Finding The Evidence

Read more

2:16am

Tue March 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Bioethics Panel Warns Against Anthrax Vaccine Testing On Kids

Originally published on Tue March 19, 2013 9:42 am

The anthrax vaccine has been given to more than 1 million adults in the military. But no one knows how well it would work in children.
Randy Davey Reuters/Landov

A controversial government proposal to test the anthrax vaccine in children would be unethical without first conducting much more research, a presidential commission concluded Tuesday.

"The federal government would have to take multiple steps before anthrax vaccine trials with children could be ethically considered," Amy Gutmann, who chairs the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, tells Shots. "It would not be ethical to do it today."

Read more

2:15am

Tue March 19, 2013
Shots - Health News

Alzheimer's 'Epidemic' Now A Deadlier Threat To Elderly

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 6:44 am

Social worker Nuria Casulleres shows a portrait of Audrey Hepburn to elderly men during a memory activity at the Cuidem La Memoria elderly home in Barcelona, Spain, last August. The home specializes in Alzheimer's patients.
David Ramos Getty Images

Alzheimer's disease doesn't just steal memories. It takes lives.

The disease is now the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and figures released Tuesday by the Alzheimer's Association show that deaths from the disease increased by 68 percent between 2000 and 2010.

Read more

2:14am

Tue March 19, 2013
The Salt

'Drunken Botanist' Takes A Garden Tour Of The Liquor Cabinet

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:43 am

The next time you're sipping on a glass of something boozy, consider the plants behind your beverage. Some of them might spring immediately to mind: grapes in your wineglass, rye in your whiskey bottle, juniper in your gin and tonic. But what about sorghum and coriander? Cinchona and bitter orange?

Read more

11:38am

Mon March 18, 2013
Politics

Justice Department's Tom Perez Tapped For Labor Secretary

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a new labor secretary.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: President Obama has chosen justice department lawyer Thomas Perez for the post. Perez is the son of immigrants from the Dominican Republic. He ran the labor department in his home state of Maryland and he will add a high profile Latino voice to the cabinet. But, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports, his nomination is not without controversy.

Read more

Pages