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Marketplace Morning Report at 4:50, 6:50 and 8:50
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Get It Growing at 7:19
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2:04am

Wed January 30, 2013
The Salt

To Maximize Weight Loss, Eat Early in The Day, Not Late

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 9:44 am

Front-loading your calories may help you lose weight.
Gaelle Cohen iStockphoto.com

You've heard the dieting advice to eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper? Well, there's mounting evidence that there's some truth to it.

A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity builds on previous studies that suggest it's best not to eat too many calories late in the day.

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2:03am

Wed January 30, 2013
Law

Polling Firm Gallup Lands In Legal Hot Water

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 12:17 pm

The Gallup Organization made its name with landmark public opinion polls. The company surveyed everything from presidential elections to religious preferences, branding itself as the most trusted name in polling.

But lately, Gallup's name has been tarnished by a whistle-blower lawsuit and a suspension from winning federal contracts.

Gallup's roots stretch back to 1922, when its founder, George Gallup, was a college junior. He got a summer job interviewing people in St. Louis.

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2:02am

Wed January 30, 2013
Asia

In China, The Government Isn't The Only Spy Game In Town

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 9:44 am

A man sells surveillance cameras at the main electronics market in Tienhe district, Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, on Aug. 8.
EPA /Landov

The final of two reports

It all started with a local Chinese official.

He couldn't figure out how his wife, who suspected him of having an affair, knew the contents of his private conversations.

"His wife knew things that he said in his car and office, including conversations over the telephone," recalls Qi Hong, a former journalist from Shandong province in eastern China, and a friend of the official.

So Qi asked a buddy who owned bug-detecting equipment to help.

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1:59am

Wed January 30, 2013
Science

When Crime Pays: Prison Can Teach Some To Be Better Criminals

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 10:26 am

Prison provides an opportunity for networking with more seasoned criminals.
iStockphoto.com

In popular lore — movies, books and blogs — criminals who go to prison don't come out reformed. They come out worse.

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3:35pm

Tue January 29, 2013
U.S.

Debate Over Rebuilding Beaches Post-Sandy Creates Waves

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 11:49 am

Ongoing beach nourishment, like this project in Viriginia Beach, has been the topic of debate. Some people say it's needed to protect beach communities; others decry the costs.
Pam Spaugy U.S. Army

For a half-century, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been in the beach business, dredging up new sand as shorelines wash away. Federal disaster aid for Superstorm Sandy could provide billions more for beach rebuilding, and that has revived an old debate: Is this an effective way to protect against storms, or a counterproductive waste of tax dollars?

On a recent blustery day at Virginia Beach, the latest beach nourishment project is in full swing. A bulldozer smooths out pyramids of sand, and on the horizon, a large, black hopper dredge appears with another load.

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