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Copyright 2017 Classical New England. To see more, visit Classical New England.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Environmental Protection Agency has a pretty simple mission in principle: to protect human health and the environment. It's a popular purpose too. Nearly three out of four U.S. adults believe the country "should do whatever it takes to protect the environment," according to a 2016 survey by the Pew Research Center.

Political support for the EPA, though, is less effusive.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Congressman Elijah Cummings has questions, questions about President Trump's administration.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It is Cummings' job to ask. He is the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Monopoly, the board game, is getting a revamp. Makers of the game want to pick the next generation of game pieces, you know, the car, the battleship, the top hat.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Keep it upside down for luck.

This weekend marks 75 years since President Roosevelt's executive order that sent Japanese-Americans to internment camps.

Roy Ebihara and his wife, 82-year-old Aiko, were children then, and both were held in camps with their families.

At StoryCorps, 83-year-old Roy told Aiko about what happened in his hometown of Clovis, N.M., in the weeks just before the executive order was issued.

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