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Weekdays 4am to 9am
Renee Montagne, Steve Inskeep, and Kate Archer Kent

Morning Edition,  NPR's premiere morning. 

Marketplace Morning Report at 4:50, 6:50 and 8:50
A Moment of Science at 6:36
Get It Growing at 7:19
Earth and Sky at 7:33
History Matters at 7:35 on Tuesday
Eco Tech Minute at 7:33 Wednesday's
What Was I Thinking at 7:35 on Thursday
Dr. Archie McDonald's Commentary at 7:35 on Friday

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9:00pm

Thu March 22, 2012
StoryCorps

Two Lost Souls Find Each Other In A Hospital

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 12:39 pm

Winslow and Dorothy Jackson met at a hospital six years ago and have since decided to see the world together.
StoryCorps

Winslow Jackson was divorced when he met Dorothy Biebrich in 2006 at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta.

She was widowed.

They also both had multiple sclerosis.

"On my birthday, I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis; three years later, my wife left, and we were divorced," Winslow, 62, said during a recent visit to StoryCorps in Atlanta. "And that was, undoubtedly, the saddest time of my life, because I felt so stranded."

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3:00pm

Thu March 22, 2012
Monkey See

Spiders And Fighting And Trees, Oh My: Filming 'The Hunger Games'

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 11:24 am

Jennifer Lawrence on the set of The Hunger Games.
Murray Close Lionsgate

There's a movie freshly out this weekend — perhaps you've heard of it.

The Hunger Games?

On Friday's Morning Edition, director Gary Ross and star Jennifer Lawrence talk to NPR's David Greene about the film.

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3:56am

Thu March 22, 2012
Planet Money

From Abe Lincoln To Donald Duck: History Of The Income Tax

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 8:02 am

U.S. Treasury Department/Walt Disney

3:40am

Thu March 22, 2012
National Security

Cybersecurity Bill: Vital Need Or Just More Rules?

Originally published on Fri March 23, 2012 6:03 am

The Homeland Security Department's Control System Security Program facilities in Idaho Falls, Idaho, are intended to protect the nation's power grid, water and communications systems. U.S. security officials and members of Congress are convinced a new law may be needed to promote improved cyberdefenses at critical facilities.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Consider what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans, and you get an idea of the consequences of a cyberattack on critical U.S. infrastructure: No electricity. No water. No transportation. Terrorists or enemy adversaries with computer skills could conceivably take down a power grid, a nuclear station, a water treatment center or a chemical manufacturing plant.

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2:52am

Thu March 22, 2012
Author Interviews

'Wonder' What It's Like To Have Kids Stare At You?

Random House

Raquel Jaramillo's debut novel, Wonder, written under the pen name R.J. Palacio, was born out of a rather embarrassing incident. The author was out with her two sons, sitting in front of an ice cream store. Her oldest had just finished fifth grade, and her youngest was still in a stroller. They spotted a girl whose face had been deformed by a medical condition.

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