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1:53pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Music

Don't Try THIS Ultimate Workout At Home

Luci "Steel" Romberg is a stuntwoman and one of the world's top female freerunners.
Chad Bonanno Courtesy of LuciRomberg.com

6:44am

Tue April 10, 2012
Europe

Sarkozy Bans Cheese Course At Presidential Palace

The chef at the presidential palace recently revealed that Nicolas Sarkozy has said no to the cheese course after meals. He doesn't drink, so no wine for him either.

6:26am

Tue April 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Honolulu City Council Race Could Make History

If E.J. Delacruz, 18, were elected, he would be the youngest person ever to hold political office in Hawaii. Not that it will be easy. A state representative is running for the same job, which also has an incumbent seeking re-election.

3:00am

Tue April 10, 2012
Sports

Miami Outraged Over Guillen's Castro Comments

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And one of baseball's better-known characters, with a knack for testing the boundaries of free speech, has created a controversy in the very first week of the season. Ozzie Guillen, new manager of the Miami Marlins, is holding a press conference today in Miami to apologize. It's all about some comments he made about Cuba's Fidel Castro. Joining us now is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman. Good morning.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

MONTAGNE: OK. What did he say?

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3:00am

Tue April 10, 2012
Technology

'Do Not Track' Web Browser Option Gains Steam

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 10:10 am

Several Web browsers, including Mozilla's Firefox, enable users to request additional privacy online via a "do not track" button. But there's no consensus on how much privacy the button should offer users.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Government regulators in the U.S. and Europe are putting pressure on the online advertising industry to adopt a new Web browser option called "do not track." The option is designed to let people request more privacy from the websites they visit.

But there's no consensus yet on how much privacy users should expect. An Internet industry task force convenes Tuesday in Washington to try to hash that out.

Some browsers, like Internet Explorer, Safari and Firefox, already come with a "do not track" button. Other browsers are expected to add the feature soon.

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