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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

So last year, Ian Griffin, an astronomer in Dunedin, New Zealand, was able to catch a ride on the NASA SOFIA. It's a Boeing 747 airplane with an observatory on board.

IAN GRIFFIN: And on that flight it had an absolutely amazing view of the aurora australis.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Revolutionary War and Civil War are in the distant past, but their remnants continue to be problems today. In Charleston, S.C., cannonballs from those wars wash up on beaches or are found underground regularly.

And while some are benign pieces of history, others have the potential to explode and military bomb experts are called in to detonate them.

Detective Carl Makins, with the Charleston County bomb squad, says a lot of people don't understand how dangerous these cannonballs are.

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