Black History Month Specials

Various Times

Join us as we celebrate the incredible achievements and contributions in the arts, literature, sciences, and humanities that African Americans have achieved through the centuries.

Airs Friday, February 24 at 9 p.m.  Zydeco Nation is an hour-long, music-rich documentary that tells the story about an epic chapter in modern American history. Starting during World War II, French-speaking Louisiana Creoles began moving across the country to Northern California in search of both jobs and freedom. They were part of the Great Migration: the movement of six million African Americans from the Jim Crow South to the big cities of the West, North, and Midwest starting in 1915.

http://www.drjazz.ch/album/bobmarley.html
Ueli Frey / This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

Airs, Thursday, February 23, 2017, at 8 p.m.  This one-hour program features live music from and stories about his last concert.  Songs recorded live at Pittsburgh's Stanley Theater in Sep 1980 include "Exodus," "Could You Be Loved," "Redemption Song," "No Woman, No Cry," "Jamming" and more.  Rita, Damien and Rohan Marley are interviewed, as well as Marcia Griffiths, biographer Vivien Goldman, and Doug Gebhard - a former journalist who covered the 1980 Pittsburgh show and is now a priest.

https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q2073333
Pete Souza / This image is a work of an employee of the Executive Office of the President of the United States, taken or made as part of that person's official duties. As a work of the U.S. federal government, the image is in the public domain.

Airs Monday, February, 27, 2017, at 8 p.m. Valley Fontaine argues that part of the reason Michelle Obama is so important to black women around the world is as a counterblast to what's described as "shade-ism" - discrimination on the basis of the darkness of skin color. Michelle Obama, it's argued, is seen as a near-unique figure in contemporary America, as a black woman married to a prominent black man of a skin shade lighter than her own. Within the black community, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, that matters – especially to women.

Press Image / Say it Loud

Airs Monday, February 20 at 8 p.m. "Say It Loud" traces the last 50 years of black history through stirring, historically important speeches by African Americans from across the political spectrum. With recordings unearthed from libraries and sound archives, and made widely available here for the first time, "Say It Loud" includes landmark speeches by Malcolm X, Lorraine Hansberry, Angela Davis, Martin Luther King Jr., Henry Louis Gates, and many others.

Press Image / WQXR and WNYC

Airs Monday, February 20, 2017, at 11 a.m. In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause. Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

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