All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.   Includes Stardate at 5:32pm

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4:50pm

Mon October 22, 2012
All Tech Considered

European Union Protests Google's New Privacy Policy

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:53 pm

In this photo illustration, the Google logo is seen through a pair of glasses in Glasgow, Scotland. The European Union says a change in Google's privacy policy is a breach of European privacy law.
Jeff J. Mitchell Getty Images

Parisian dance professor Charlotte King says she needs Google for her job and life, but she doesn't trust the world's top Web search engine.

"When I'm doing some research, the day after I have some proposition of products, of stores, of places, and it's really espionage. I was spied on. I don't want that. It's unacceptable," King says.

That viewpoint resonates in Europe. The European Union says a recent change in Google's privacy policy that allows it to combine and share data collected from all of its different services is a breach of European privacy law.

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3:24pm

Mon October 22, 2012
Around the Nation

For Many Florida Ex-Cons, Voting Booth Is Off-Limits

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 6:44 pm

Richard Flores, 47, had his civil rights restored at a clemency board hearing on June 28. Convicted of vehicular manslaughter in 1994, he served one year of house arrest. He had been waiting since then to have his right to vote restored.
Michael Ciaglo News21

Across the nation, the number of people who have lost the right to vote because of a felony conviction has grown dramatically in the past three decades. Currently, almost 6 million people don't have that right — and about 1.5 million of them live in Florida.

While some states are making it easier for felons to get their voting rights back, Florida has taken the opposite approach — and the path for former convicts trying to get those rights back is often an arduous one.

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3:24pm

Mon October 22, 2012
Law

What Happens After Jurors Get It Wrong?

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 7:16 pm

Juror Anita Woodruff is haunted by her decision to help convict Santae Tribble of murder.
Carrie Johnson NPR

About 300 people have been wrongfully convicted and exonerated in the U.S. thanks to DNA evidence. But overlooked in those stories are the accounts of jurors who unwittingly played a role in the injustice.

One of those stories is playing out in Washington, D.C., where two jurors who helped convict a teenager of murder in 1981 are now persuaded that they were wrong. They're dealing with their sense of responsibility by leading the fight to declare him legally innocent.

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3:24pm

Mon October 22, 2012
Music Interviews

Kendra Morris: Skateboards And Karaoke Machines

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:25 pm

Kendra Morris' debut album is titled Banshee.
Eric White Courtesy of the artist

12:33pm

Mon October 22, 2012
Africa

Will The '24-Hour City' Of Cairo Call It A Night?

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:54 pm

Nighttime shoppers pause to look at a display at Cairo's Ataba market in May 2011. The government says shops must close earlier in order to save scarce electricity, but many Cairo residents are complaining.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

When the sun goes down, Cairo bursts to life. Men play backgammon and smoke water pipes. Young fashionistas meet friends for midnight coffees. Families go shopping with small kids in tow.

Life in the Egyptian capital is lived at night. Last year, one study rated Cairo the "most 24-hour city" in the world. New York City trailed far behind at No. 32.

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