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All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4pm
Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.   Includes Stardate at 5:32pm

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4:32pm

Thu May 28, 2015
Shots - Health News

CDC Investigates Live Anthrax Shipments

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

A security fence surrounds the main part of the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Ground, a testing laboratory in the Utah desert. The Army says it mistakenly shipped live anthrax from Dugway to several labs in the U.S. and Korea.
George Frey Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is still trying to figure out how the military managed to ship anthrax spores that were apparently live from one of its facilities to more than a dozen labs across the United States.

"We have a team at the [military] lab to determine what may have led to this incident," says CDC spokesman Jason McDonald. In addition, he says, the agency is working with health officials in nine states to make sure the potentially live samples are safely disposed of and the labs affected are decontaminated.

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4:25pm

Thu May 28, 2015
All Tech Considered

Blind Auditions Could Give Employers A Better Hiring Sense

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

In the face-to-face interview process, research shows that managers tend to hire applicants who are similar to them on paper.
Bjorn Rune Lie Getty Images/Ikon Images

Entrepreneur Petar Vujosevic was just a regular guy who saw a big problem with the way the hiring system works.

Typically, a hiring manager posts an opening, describes the ideal candidate and resumes come flooding in. After doing some interviews, the manager has to make a gut decision: Who is the best person for the job?

Research shows that more often than not, managers pick someone whose background is similar to theirs.

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4:23pm

Thu May 28, 2015
National Security

Foreign Policy Experts Weigh In On U.S. Strategy Against The Islamic State

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 8:01 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:20pm

Wed May 27, 2015
Business

On The Road To Recovery, Detroit's Property Taxes Aren't Helping

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:45 am

Detroit is attracting entrepreneurs who like the relatively cheap workspaces. But real estate developers and business owners like Sean Harrington, who turned the Iodent Building into an apartment complex, are paying the price in property taxes.
Jason Margolis NPR

With new businesses sprouting up left and right, there's a lot of talk these days about Detroit being on the comeback trail.

A great thing about the city is that it's easy to become a real estate mogul. But some entrepreneurs might have reason to pause.

A new study released Tuesday shows that Detroit's commercial property taxes are the highest of any city in the nation.

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5:08pm

Wed May 27, 2015
Music Interviews

When This 9-Year-Old Pianist Plays, He Feels The Music

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 7:31 am

Oscar Paz Suaznabar started playing keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The now 9-year-old pianist has played at Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.
Courtesy Oscar Paz Suaznabar

When Oscar Paz Suaznabar plays the piano, he does so with feeling.

The Alexandria, Va., resident has played at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and on the NPR show From the Top. He is 9 years old.

Oscar started playing his older sister's keyboard by ear when he was just 2. The sorrow he conveys when he plays "The Lark" by Russian composer Mikhail Glinka is drawn from the kind of loss any 9-year-old can understand.

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