Uri Berliner

As Senior Editor at NPR, Uri Berliner oversees coverage of business and the economy. He has supervised and edited much of NPR's work on the financial crisis, the auto industry, energy and the workplace. Berliner has helped to build Planet Money, a prize-winnng multimedia team that covers the global economy.

Until recently, Berliner also edited NPR's sports coverage and was part of a team that won an Edward R. Murrow award for reporting on the 2008 Olympics in Beijing.

Berliner came to NPR in 1999 from California, where he worked as a reporter for 12 years at daily newspapers in San Diego and Santa Barbara. At the San Diego Union-Tribune, he covered wildfires, street gangs, the border and military issues before becoming the paper's economics correspondent. His feature writing and investigative reporting earned several awards.

In 1998, Berliner was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he studied business, history and economics. The following year he moved to Washington, D.C.

Originally from New York City, Berliner received his undergraduate degree from Sarah Lawrence College, and went on to receive his Master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

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1:53am

Thu June 27, 2013
The Salt

Coffee Futures: The Highs And Lows Of A Cup Of Joe

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 11:49 am

Want to invest in coffee futures? One roaster says when it comes to the price of coffee, it "is like a roller coaster."
Joe Raedle Getty Images

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

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2:17am

Wed June 19, 2013
Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing

The Art Of Investing: The Rewards Aren't Always Financial

Originally published on Wed June 19, 2013 8:40 am

Flower Study #14 by Vladimir Kryloff, the painting NPR's Uri Berliner bought as an investment for $450.
Vladimir Kryloff

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

Read more

3:26am

Thu June 13, 2013
Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing

How To Invest In Real Estate Without Being A Landlord

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:32 am

NPR's Uri Berliner discovers that among his REIT holdings is one that owns the Washington, D.C., site where, until recently, NPR had its headquarters. The building is being torn down and a new building with law offices will go up in its place.
Marie McGrory NPR

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

Read more

2:24am

Wed June 5, 2013
Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing

Resisting The Temptation To 'Win' When Investing

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:17 pm

Hey mutual fund investors: Think you can beat the market? Charley Ellis, who's worked in investment management for 50 years, doubts it. That's because the fees actively managed funds charge can get expensive.
Richard Drew AP

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

Read more

2:02am

Thu May 30, 2013
Dollar For Dollar: Adventures In Investing

How A Trip To Costco Can Work As An Investment Strategy

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 7:19 am

A recent trip to Costco cost NPR's Uri Berliner $303.53. The haul included razor blades, cans of soup and tuna fish, laundry detergent, heartburn relief medicine and dog treats. As an investment, it will pay off if he uses what he bought — and if the price tag for the same items is higher if he returns in a year.
Mary-Elizabeth Berliner

NPR's Uri Berliner is taking $5,000 of his own savings and putting it to work. Though he's no financial whiz or guru, he's exploring different types of investments — alternatives that may fare better than staying in a savings account that's not keeping up with inflation.

Read more

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