Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The daughter of a Russian ex-spy, who was poisoned along with her father last month in southern England, was discharged from the hospital, according to medical officials.

Yulia Skripal, 33, was released on Monday, while her father, 66-year-old Sergei Skripal, is improving rapidly.

"Yulia has asked for privacy from the media and I want to reiterate her request," Christine Blanshard, deputy chief executive and medical director at Salisbury hospital said in a news conference on Tuesday.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET

China's President Xi Jinping says his country will "significantly lower" import tariffs on automobiles as part of a broader move to open up its economy amid a major trade dispute with the U.S.

In a speech at the Boao Forum for Asia, a business forum held on China's southern Hainan island, Xi appeared to be aiming to show his country is a leader in promoting global free markets and to defuse trade tensions with Washington.

Colombian authorities have arrested a former peace negotiator for the rebel group FARC on a warrant seeking his extradition to the U.S. on cocaine smuggling charges.

Seuxis Hernandez, also known by the alias Jesus Santrich, was taken into custody at his residence in the capital, Bogota, on an arrest warrant issued by the U.S. District Court in the Southern District of New York charging him with conspiracy to smuggle $15 million worth of cocaine into the U.S., according to an Interpol notice quoted by The Associated Press.

Updated at 12 p.m. ET

Amid international outcry over an alleged poison gas attack in Syria over the weekend, Damascus said one of its air bases had come under attack, first blaming the U.S., but later Israel.

Meanwhile, President Trump says the White House will be making a decision on Syria in the next day or two, saying the reported attack was "atrocious" and "can't be allowed to happen."

Todd Brassner, a 67-year-old art dealer who died in a fire in Trump Tower over the weekend, had reportedly been trying to sell his 50th-floor apartment there since President Trump was elected, The New York Times reports.

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