Sam Sanders

Sam has worked at Vermont Public Radio since October 1978 in various capacities – almost always involving audio engineering. He excels at sound engingeering for live performances.

Sam has been an audio engineer for most of his professional life. From 1965 to 1978 he was the Supervising Audio Technician at the New York Public Library Record Archives at Lincoln Center.

He enjoys camping, hiking, canoeing, and contra dancing; and he loves to travel, especially to Peru and the Caribbean. Sam has served for many years as a volunteer in response to the AIDS epidemic.

As America continues to absorb the results of a truly contentious and historic presidential election, one group of voters may be particularly upset: Bernie Sanders supporters. For months over the course of the campaign, many in Sanders' ranks said he was the only candidate with a sure shot at beating Trump, that he could reach working class voters better than Hillary Clinton could, and that he offered a true progressive agenda that Clinton could not.

But these supporters never got the chance to be proven right — or wrong. So now, some of them vent.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

We're also joined now by NPR's Rachel Martin. She'll be hosting our election night special with us which begins in just about 10 minutes. Rachel, welcome.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hey, Rachel.

I've noticed two distinct ways social media have changed the way we talk to each other about politics. Clearly, they have changed a lot, maybe everything, but two fairly new phenomena stand out.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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